1,918 reputation
11633
bio website none
location Germany
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen Jul 11 at 14:56

Jul
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awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
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awarded  Notable Question
May
15
asked Minimal nginx configuration for localhost?
May
2
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Apr
28
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26
asked How to change the audio device controlled by the volume icon in the KDE tray?
Apr
15
answered Synchronized Clipboard?
Mar
25
awarded  Yearling
Mar
21
revised Synergy client won't connect, despite open port?
added the network names of the computers at the beginning, to prevent misunderstanding
Mar
21
comment Synergy client won't connect, despite open port?
@Sathya Clarke is the client, with IP ending in 39. Bradbury is the server, with IP ending in 22.
Mar
21
asked Synergy client won't connect, despite open port?
Feb
24
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
10
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Jan
8
asked How to export comments from a PDF file?
Jan
7
comment Is there such a thing as an “HDR monitor”?
@Thomas even if we should have the technology to push up the upper limit of monitor brightness, we shouldn't do it. The human eye is not sensitive to absolute light levels, but to differences. Staring for hours into a bright monitor in a dim room is very hard for the human visual signal processing neurons, in a way that getting different levels of reflected sunlight on a bright day isn't. Personally, when I set my monitor brightness at around 30%, I am much less tired after a workday. Reducing the lightness of black pixels is viable, but won't give us "natural" contrast levels.
Jan
7
comment Is there such a thing as an “HDR monitor”?
Actually, there is both chroma contrast and luma contrast. I agree that luminence contrast is more important, but a HDR image uses both (or should use both - maybe some algorithms disregard this), to deliver more "punch". So a wide-gamut monitor will display a HDR image better than a standard monitor, because the chroma contrast will be better represented.
Jan
7
comment Is there such a thing as an “HDR monitor”?
@Thomas monitors work by sending out light into human eyes, and swallowing certain parts of the light in certain pixels. The light amount produced by the backlight is puny when compared to what the human eye can perceive. And the liquid crystals in front of it cannot change their opacity all that much, so even black pixels radiate quite a big part of the backlight's light, and white pixels still swallow a lot of light. No background lit display can be even medium-dynamic range. From Wikipedia, "A display emits between 50 and 300 cd/m2. The sun has luminance of 1.6×10^9 cd/m2 at noon"
Dec
22
awarded  Popular Question