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Sep
19
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
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Sep
15
comment Windows equivalent of the Linux command 'touch'?
Unfortunately this does not work (at least not in Windows 7). It seems that the command interpreter does not update the timestamp of the destination of a redirection if the file is not actually modified (i.e., there is not data to redirect).
Sep
15
comment How do you create an empty file from the command line in Windows
You can use any command, @8088, not any command, only commands which do not output anything to stderr. For example, try ren 2> file.
Sep
15
comment Windows equivalent of the Linux command 'touch'?
This will be slow if the files are large. Actually, it is not slow, it does it in less than one second, and does not even light up the HD-access LED. Clearly the copy command in Windows has the touch command specially coded in, per the Technet article. +1 Great find; I never knew this one.
Sep
7
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Sep
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Sep
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awarded  Notable Question
Sep
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awarded  Famous Question
Sep
1
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Aug
28
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
23
comment How is PNG lossless given that it has a compression parameter?
Typically you get diminishing returns (i.e., not as much decrease in size compared to the increase in time it takes) when going up to the highest compression levels, but it's up to you. Actually, it is up to the circumstances. If you’re saving a file here or there, you may as well use the maximum compression since it’s irrelevant if it takes an extra few seconds. However, if you’re constantly doing 1,000’s (e.g., in a web-server), then that is where compression level matters. It’s not so much a question of when to use more (that’s clearly what’s desired), but rather, when to use less.
Aug
21
comment Why is checking Windows Update so slow?
Most files have multiple patches available, but they don’t all come out in a nice, orderly one-at-a-time fashion; they essentially come out randomly. It is difficult enough to apply different patches to a text file (look at the complexity of versioning systems), but with a binary file it is so much worse. If you check a file and it seems to not have patch A1-q44.3pr1S_7 (flat numbers won’t suffice), should you apply it? Does it already have a more recent patch? How does this patch interact/interfere with others? Version patching is mindbogglingly confounding in thought, let alone code.
Aug
21
comment How can I enable Silverlight in Google Chrome 42+?
But are you really surprised that Google lied and did whatever the hell it wants regardless of user feedback? If not, then you clearly don’t have much experience with Google (lucky you).
Aug
21
comment How can I enable Silverlight in Google Chrome 42+?
Too bad you can't selectively block (click-to-play) HTML5 elements, so welcome to the age of wasted bandwidth, memory, CPU cycles, and the land of no peace and quiet with more and more damned big, long, loud autoplaying HD videos everywhere (especially ads) and no way to prevent it.
Aug
17
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