203 reputation
213
bio website timothyawiseman.wordpress.com
location Las Vegas, NV
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Oct 23 '13 at 21:21

A SQL Server DBA that dabbles in Python, Linux, and math. On the rare occassions I have time, I play Go.


Nov
18
comment Legal way to get movies/shows onto a non-networked computer
@iglvzx We occassionally use DVD's now, but that is much less convenient (Small DVD collection of mostly kids shows is downstairs with the only TV) and while my son handles them quite well, my daughter is much younger than him and has a tendency of using them like frisbees.
Nov
18
comment Legal way to get movies/shows onto a non-networked computer
@WilliamHilsum My primary reasons for not networking are physical rather than control. My router is downstairs and their computer is upstairs, so physical is out. I could use wifi, but that computer is older and doesn't have wifi built in. I could add that of course but I'm reluctant to spend money doing that for a computer that has no reason to get on the network other than accessing silly DRM servers..
Nov
18
comment Sharing files between multiple computers?
Dropbox will support virtually any amount of data you care to give it, so long as you are willing to pay enough. Though, a plan that big is probably far outside the budget for a school yearbook and probably overkill.
Nov
18
comment Is overclocking legal?
Great answer. To expand, some motherboards and processors mostly targeting the "Enthusiast" crowd do make it relatively easily, but most don't because such tools can be dangerous in the hands of people that don't know what they are doing exactly as you say.
Nov
16
comment What computer components are currently vulnerable to magnets?
@Shawn The normal magnets you will find around an average house will not do much to modern electronics for reasonable exposure levels (there is an exception for particularly senstive things like floppy disks, and CRTs). So, an average consumer does not need to worry about it. For your not so average consumer, Wikipedia has a good write up at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_shielding
Nov
16
comment What computer components are currently vulnerable to magnets?
@JohnSonmez I am not sure I would call Yahoo! Answers authoritative. With that said, it is a useful link, +1.
Nov
16
comment What computer components are currently vulnerable to magnets?
It is about the strength, duration of exposure, and relative motion of the magnet with the harddrive. Weak magnets will generally not do anything, relative strong magnets for a short time won't do much. A strong magnet, for a longer period of time, especially if it is in motion relative to the electronics will corrupt the data (and a really strong magnet in motion for a long period of time can fry just about any unshielded electronics.) (Edit for clairty: By strong I mean far stronger than most people have lying around. Even old harddrives are more reiliant than most people think.)
Nov
10
comment Laptop screen as a PC monitor?
Remote desktop should come very close with a decent network connection for your average computer tasks, though it would likely have problems with anything graphics intensive like gaming.
Nov
7
comment What is the best way to keep a folder synchronized with my USB drive?
Subversion (personally I prefer Mercurial) is fantastic for documents you are working on and actively maintaining. It works much less well for just synching arbitrary folders with files you are not actively changing or maintianing. I love Mercurial for programming and even for more traditional writing. I would not use it to maintain my MP3 collection or even a collection of pictures of my kids.
Nov
7
comment Is there any P2P private file storage?
Personally, I go with truecrypt + dropbox as Darth Android suggest (with a local NAS serving as local backup). If you are concerned about the reliability of one company, you could easily point multiple services towards your truecypt file. You could for instance easily have dropbox and carbonite both backing up the truecrypt file.
Aug
19
comment What is the maximum amount of Ram that Windows Vista can productively use?
Perhaps I worded it poorly, but I was looking for an objective answer and found it elsewhere. Windows Vista has different caps for different versions, but 32 bit versions cannot address more than 4GB msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… But the 32bit version only productively uses 3GB at most. 4sysops.com/archives/… But the 64 bit version can productively use more until the cap for that version is reached.