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Mar
28
comment Why are hex editors called binary editors?
Yes, but many data files are binary as well. They save on space and translation when they are read by the appropriate application. Also, even text files are often encrypted or compressed making them binary files.
Mar
21
comment Do web browsers use different outgoing ports for different tabs?
+1 for great answer - especially step 20. :)
Mar
21
comment How does port-forwarding help in torrents?
The way I understand it (which may be wrong) is that with no open port, your client has to find and initiate all connections to other clients. It only looks for new connections every so often, sometimes with long delays between tries, so it can be much faster if other clients can find you too whenever they happen to look. This is really just another way of saying the same thing as this answer.
Mar
21
comment How does port-forwarding help in torrents?
This is what I was going to say. Some torrents have almost no activity with the port closed. I often see that a vast majority of my connections are incoming. And they don't happen unless a port is open. Also, aside from any security concerns, if you have an old router, using uPNP can fill up the table in the router and cause other problems.
Feb
3
comment Firefox cannot save files (most of the time), how to solve?
Just a guess: On Windows, doesn't almost everything write at least something to the registry during installation or to somewhere else that isn't owned by a regular user? An install done without admin privileges couldn't do that and something is bound to go wrong - although you'd think the install itself would catch that as an error.
Jan
19
answered Can't enter the password
Jan
18
comment Can't enter the password
There has to be a way for Linux to know which keyboard layout to start with. It's a basic requirement for international users, but I don't know what it is. Until you find a real solution to this problem, you can work around it by booting into single user mode (as root) and changing your password to one that works with the keyboard layout that you currently have. To boot into single user mode - to reset passwords Boot from any live cd load as single (root) chroot /dev/sdaX where sdaX is the root (/) linux partition run passwd and assign new passwords reboot
Jan
18
comment What is the fastest way to select the even files in a Windows folder?
Not the easiest way to go for this simple criterion, but if you do have cygwin installed, then there are all sorts of things you can do (relatively easily) just in the bash shell it provides to sub-select files in almost any way imaginable - for cases far more complex than this one.
Jan
18
comment Limit Excel CPU Usage
If it's really slow and you don't need to update in "real time" as you make changes, you could always export the relevant data in some format like CSV, run it through a compiled program (FORTRAN, or what ever language works best) and then import the results back in. Excel isn't the only hammer you can use on this nail.
Jan
18
comment Do most music CDs contain the needed info about their tracks?
+1 Amazing answer with lots of things I did not know for a question which could essentially be answered by "No."
Jan
12
comment How to find a directory on linux?
I've never looked into it, but updatedb/locate does not index all partitions on all drives, so it doesn't always find things that are there. If what you want is (mounted) under /, it should find it, but if it's on another partition, it probably won't.
Jan
12
comment Why are operating systems (usually?) unable to access BIOS settings?
I haven't looked at anything that low level in ages, but way back (Z80 ...), some computers would map the bios into high memory at boot so it would be accessible. Once booting was done, they would remap those blocks to actual ram so the computer would have just a little bit more of its precious 64k of address space to use. If it did that, then the bios was not in the memory map and could not be accessed without playing with the memory map again.
Jan
12
comment Is there any danger when connecting a USB Y cable?
I have a drive which usually needs a Y cable to spin up and then works without it. It does seem to get disconnected occasionally when using one plug, so I try not to do it when I have a choice. The key here as mentioned in several answers is that USB ports (are supposed to) provide a fixed voltage. As long as they do that, then the device will "determine" how much current it needs and will draw (at most) that much. This is because of basic physics and is not dependent on anything "fancy" in the USB port or in the device. Adding a second port just makes more current available.
Dec
28
comment How to quickly get the previous line output in a terminal without using a mouse?
This looks really cool and maybe something I'd like to add to my system. Could you add some information on how it works? The built-in code for handling completions and things like this is pretty hard to understand.
Dec
1
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
1
comment Remapping SysRq in Linux
Upon rereading your question, I see that I missed that you had already done that.
Jul
28
comment thunderbirds scrolls back to a selected folder
I don't use Windows, but on the Linux version I can click on a folder to select it and then control click on it to unselect it. BTW, I have a lot of folders and I do not see this problem. I would see something like it if I selected the folder, scrolled the folder list, and then clicked on a message in the message pane. This correct behavior might look like a bug if I wasn't paying attention. Just scrolling the folder list does not affect the message pane (for good reasons).
Jul
22
comment Using home NAS as a substitute for local storage: Performance and application compatibility considerations
That's partly why I made it a comment rather than an answer. If you're the only one using the data, then keeping it synced should be relatively easy because there's only one of you. If others modify it too, then it gets complicated very quickly. You can always run a manual sync whenever you get done editing a secondary copy. It's just some place to start until you find a "real" solution.
Jul
20
comment Using home NAS as a substitute for local storage: Performance and application compatibility considerations
It's really good to have your primary store of data in one place (your NAS), but if you run into something that's too slow, you could also keep a full copy of the relevant data on your notebook (if it will fit). You just need to setup something like rsync (should be available cross platform) to keep the two copies in sync with the latest changes. If you use rsync, then a NAS that allows you to run rsyncd, the backend part, would really come in handy. Some NAS hardware will run nas4free which will do that and more, but it's Linux, so there'd be a bit of a learning curve.
Jul
20
comment Why might a file transfer be going hideously slowly on Windows, but fast on Linux?
Just to state the obvious: If you don't find the real answer to this, they could always get something like a Raspberry Pi just to do the downloads with it. Hardware used to come with all sorts of proprietary interfaces. You could still do whatever user magic is required to make/configure the download on the normal client OS and just pass it to the Pi for the download.