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Jun
23
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
8
awarded  Commentator
Jan
8
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
comment How can i move files with xargs in linux
"better" is subjective. More powerful, more complex, and slower; and while mv doesn't care if you process files together or individually, some other uses might.
Jan
8
comment How can i move files with xargs in linux
@user1953864: -i (or -J) specify a token that will be replaced with the incoming arguments, instead of them just being tacked onto the end. man xargs
Jan
8
comment How can i move files with xargs in linux
@Scott: I was staying as close to original, just changing to make it work.
Jan
8
answered How can i move files with xargs in linux
Dec
27
comment Why is diez character over the keyboard not recongised?
Your physical keyboard paint job and layout does not match what the OS thinks it is. Your OS probably thinks you're British, but your keyboard is designed for somewhere else. If you teach your OS what keyboard you actually have, it should improve. This might help.
Nov
28
answered wget : how to get a directory to a specify directory
Jun
5
comment Wake up my company computer from a home computer
@NikhilAgrawal: I believe the asker is thinking of this
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
DHCP would not have any choice but to reassign australia to him. Some ISPs will not sign up more users than they have IPs; however, since a lot of people are only occasionally online, a greedier company will count on some people being offline, so that their IPs get reused. The reason why DHCP tries to preserve your IP address is so that if you're running a server, say, a web-server, people around the world can type in australia.dev.make-interactive.com and get to your machine (and not a random one in your neighbourhood).
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
You misunderstand. It tries to keep it same, as long as possible. They're not random, someone made up a list: one for each public-facing IP that they are allotted. Let's say they have 256 public IPs: one for the router, and 255 for the customers. Each of the public IPs has its own name. The IP you are currently assigned to happens to be australia.dev.make-interactive.com. You will keep this name as long as possible. If there is ever a situation where you are not connected, 254 other users are (leaving australia free), and another user that isn't you connects,
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
Semirandomly. Usually, DHCP, as long as it has capacity, will try to remember who it gave which name to. But if it has 255 available slots and 300 users, every now and then it won't have a choice but to assign you a new name. So it depends on how your ISP manages its business.
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
In short, because your DHCP server tells it to, and your computer is set to use it by default. There was a tiny bit of info in the linked article about what to do about it, but it is deprecated; if you follow the trail (like, finding this article), you will find @LowvaPrg's solution on how to change this default.
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
That's the thing - the fact that your preferences don't match, and the fact that your full hostname is australia.dev.make-interactive.com, suggest pretty strongly that it comes from your ISP's DHCP. You can take a look at this article to see how hostname is determined: DHCP, if not then DNS, if not then System Prefs, if not then localhost.
Dec
22
comment Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
Hostname is the human-readable name of your computer. Your default Mac OSX prompt has three pieces of info: hostname (australia), current directory (~), and username (rod).
Dec
22
answered Where does the name in the shell prompt come from?
Jun
12
awarded  Yearling
May
24
answered SSH Private Key File Won't Work (Permissions Error)