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Nov
21
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
11
comment Any Phone Adapter for Router/Modem?
There are phones that have Eth connections and there are devices that will translate PSTN to Ethernet - they run a voice protocol (such as SIP) over it to the endpoint server. To make use of this, you need to subscribe to a VoIP service and they'll provide the configuration you need for your device to connect. To @John1024's example, MagicJack is a service provider with a built-in configuration in their adapter. You simply plug in a PSTN phone and it will connect to MagicJack's services. There are other examples that are not proprietary as well as VoIP phones, such as Cisco or Avaya.
Nov
3
comment How does an ISP authenticate modem/router connection?
ISPs will typically have an index that relates circuit IDs on their MDF to a street address. There will also be mappings for how these particular circuit IDs relate to ports on the DSLAM or CMTS. In their CRM, they'll be able to see whose billing is behind (probably have automatic reports for this) and when it gets too long, they'll trace the street address for that account to a specific port and they'll down or suspend the port, or break it in some way (different systems do this in very different ways). It'll rarely have to do with anything plugged in at your end.
Nov
3
comment Ping file command
It is probably not an issue with latency, probably an issue with bandwidth - so ping MAY see it, but you might need to employ better methods to narrow down your problem, such as using SNMP to monitor bandwidth on the connection. iperf is also very useful if you control both endpoints. MTR is also very handy, as it tests latency at each hop rather than just rtt for the endpoint.
Oct
28
comment Two IP addresses, different network ID = different networks?
networks are not defined by hostnames, they are defined by subnet masks. When you run a traceroute, you see the gateways that are hit while traversing networks from one point to another. A host may have multiple IPs, both on the same and/or on different networks. A host also may have multiple DNS hostnames pointing at a single IP that it has, or multiple DNS hostnames, each pointing to a different IP it has, whether on the same network or on a different network. It may help to see the traceroute output with specific questions about any given lines on it - as it is, your question isn't clear.
Aug
16
awarded  Yearling
Aug
5
reviewed Edit What is causing a folder to act hidden when it is not?
Aug
5
revised What is causing a folder to act hidden when it is not?
added 368 characters in body
Aug
4
comment Ignore and override ISP router
You usually can't just plug in any old ADSL2+ modem into a DSL line and expect it to work. There are specific values necessary to negotiate with the DSLAM at the other end, specifically the VPI and VCI settings. There is a list of common ISP ones (speedguide.net/articles/…), but for the lesser known ISPs you'll have to call and ask them for their settings. If you're lucky, you can access the values read-only without a password in the current modem (though not all modem models allow this).
Aug
3
comment Packet Loss/High Ping with One Computer Seems to Affect Entire Network
ping timeout does not always mean packet loss. Capture from the other side to validate whether or not that device is actually sending the ICMP replies. It may be that the device is too busy at the time to pay attention to pings. The loss seen may be induced by a heavy increase in traffic caused by the PC you are adding. As noted by Joe, this is often the result of malware. A capture on the router will tell you how much/what sort of traffic of it is hitting the router from that PC. If the router can't capture, you can use an appliance: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packet_capture_appliance
Jul
23
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
8
comment What kind of IP address is this? (WIN-F9PTTKUMI2U:29901)
To be more specific, it isn't simply an address, it is a socket. The first part is a host name or address specifying which allows routing to the specific device, the second part is the port number which allows routing to the specific listening application.
Jul
1
comment Regarding the limitaions of “Listen Server”
A "ping" is actually a measure of latency between two points. What the ping application reports is round trip time in milliseconds using a protocol called ICMP (or sometimes UDP). If your friend hosts, then the round trip time, or "ping", to his machine will be however long it takes a packet to leave your machine, route to his machine and then for a reply packet to return back to your machine. Note that this value will be unique to your connection - anyone else will have their own unique route to his server and the corresponding round trip time.
Jun
10
comment Batch file can't delete a file “that's in use” but the file doesn't seem to exist?
Maybe its hidden? I found this relating to that file: symantec.com/security_response/…
May
24
comment Upgrade options for Lenovo 3000 C100 laptop
Looks like max is 2GB: crucial.com/usa/en/compatible-upgrade-for//…. And as for SSD, yes, but that doesn't mean you should.The interface type looks like it is an ultra ATA for the hard drive and an SSD with that interface is going to be much more expensive, here is a 128GB one: newegg.com/Product/…-2‌​0-208-894--Product
May
11
comment Is it possible to get a router's public IP address from wireless access points without knowing the keys?
@AthomSfere, the modem I use right now is bridged - most of the modems I have ever used across 3 different states and 8 ISPs, both cable and DSL, were also bridged - it isn't niche, it is a standard practice for many ISPs. The ISP I used to work for used bridged modems for all consumer line products. The business line products (SDSL,IDSL,T1) had routers. Even the EoC bundled service had a bridged connection.
May
11
comment What are the requirements for a “Listen Server” in video games?
Yes, latency is measured by round trip time, so that includes all legs of the journey between both end points.
May
11
comment Wired connection being dropped
If it does that repeatedly then it is a flapping iface. The link down indicates a break on layer 2 which usually is a physical issue - that can be cable, NIC or switch port. Try moving to a different switch port. If the issue continues, try replacing the cable. If that doesn't work, it is probably the NIC.
May
10
comment Wired connection being dropped
"device is not ready" may indicate an issue with the driver talking to the card - maybe a firmware issue on the card? still could be a driver issue as well.