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seen Apr 24 '12 at 18:15

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May
23
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
23
comment What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
@DanielBeck Also, a final question: How come I could change the group to _www, leaving the user as it is? I thought a file/dir had to have its user/group set such that the user is actually a part of group. I guess not...
Apr
23
comment What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
@DanielBeck Well, what I did was create a ~/webroot folder, where all of my website stuff will go, for example, my site ~/webroot/foo.com will be there. Within that, we have something like ~/webroot/foo.com/private and ~/webroot/foo.com/public. I have a symlink inside ~/Sites to ~/webroot/foo.com/public. To give Apache access, I just changed the group of ~/webroot to _www and gave this group read and execute privileges. It seems to be working fine. I’m still the owner of the folder, so I can access it. Does this sound good?
Apr
23
accepted Encrypted Time Machine backups in Lion
Apr
23
accepted What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
Apr
23
comment What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
Thanks for the info! It also looks like one of the answers in stackoverflow.com/q/2001881/288444 addresses this same thing. Thanks again.
Apr
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awarded  Commentator
Apr
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comment What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
@zpea and OP: Is there no way to make (using the example of the OP) ~/Documents a+x and ~/Documents/test a+rx only for the Apache user, as opposed to every user on the system? How would I go about doing that? I don’t want normal users, including the Guest user, to be able to browse into my Documents folder.
Apr
22
asked What are the security implications of doing “chmod a+rx ~/Documents”?
Jan
21
comment Encrypted Time Machine backups in Lion
@skub I was specifically referring to the “Encrypt backup disk” checkbox that appears under Preferences -> Time Machine -> Select Disk. Note that I have FileVault 2 turned on my local drive.
Jan
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asked Encrypted Time Machine backups in Lion
Dec
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awarded  Benefactor
Dec
7
accepted Line feeds (0x0A) transform into carriage returns (0x0D) during email file transfer
Dec
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comment Line feeds (0x0A) transform into carriage returns (0x0D) during email file transfer
I'm not sure what mail client the Lion user is using. Anyway, it's not really my issue. I'm just trying to understand why something like this would take place. (See also my reply to @Ravachol's answer below.)
Dec
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awarded  Promoter
Dec
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accepted Completely open-source and encrypted text, audio, and video chat software
Dec
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comment Line feeds (0x0A) transform into carriage returns (0x0D) during email file transfer
The attachment file I sent was indeed base64 encoded. However, after every 64 bytes there was a line feed (0x0A), which represents a newline on Mac OS X. The question still is: Why did 0x0A transform into 0x0D, leaving the total byte size of the file intact? I still don't quite get that...
Dec
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comment Line feeds (0x0A) transform into carriage returns (0x0D) during email file transfer
I'm sending it as an attachment.
Dec
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asked Line feeds (0x0A) transform into carriage returns (0x0D) during email file transfer