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location Sunnyvale, CA
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visits member for 4 years, 11 months
seen Jun 3 at 16:17

Apr
13
comment Why do we use ./progname in *nix systems to execute a program?
I'm not talking about 100% POSIX compliance, I'm talking about compliance with this one tiny portion which everyone complies with. If you're going to make the argument that what matters is practice, not standards, find me the *nix system that in practice is case insensitive. (And no, it's not just a matter of shell - the underlying system is involved.)
Apr
13
comment Why do we use ./progname in *nix systems to execute a program?
Further, POSIX says: "Environment variable names used by the utilities in the Shell and Utilities volume of IEEE Std 1003.1-2001 consist solely of uppercase letters, digits, and the '_' (underscore)..." and explicitly mentions PATH and what it should mean.
Apr
13
comment Why do we use ./progname in *nix systems to execute a program?
@Marcin: It's not a matter of shell; it's POSIX. "Uppercase and lowercase letters shall retain their unique identities and shall not be folded together. The name space of environment variable names containing lowercase letters is reserved for applications." If your shell isn't case sensitive, it's broken - and it's not bash, dash, sh, ksh, zsh, tcsh, or csh. Good luck finding *nix users who aren't using one of those.
Apr
13
comment Why do we use ./progname in *nix systems to execute a program?
-1: environment variable names are case sensitive.
Jan
13
comment Does anyone else use mouse in Vim?
Of course, of course. I'm talking mostly about multiple lines that aren't a block (counting is hard!), or selections that don't include entire lines.
Jan
13
comment Does anyone else use mouse in Vim?
Some common mouse actions can be replaced with exciting vim commands, but there's really no replacement for the mouse when you want a large visual selection.
Oct
28
answered How to restore Trash items to original location?
Aug
9
comment /etc/bashrc Permission denied
Have you managed to get into some unusual situation where root isn't root? Do you have a uid of 0?
Aug
9
awarded  Yearling
May
13
comment grep changing the delimiter
@jhon: Then don't ask how to change grep, ask how to do what you want to do with something else. For example, you can specify the record separator in perl ($/) and awk (RS). Or you could do something like echo "$var" | sed 's/<delimiter>/\n/' | grep <pattern>. Many many answers, depending on what your actual problem is.
May
13
comment grep changing the delimiter
Read the man page, see if there's such an option (no, I don't believe there is).
May
13
comment ffmpeg: create a video from images
If that's the only obstacle, you could just write a script to either rename or symlink your images to a properly reindexed set.
May
12
comment Killing all instances of Chrome on the command-line?
@kSiR: [a month late] yes, but $(...) is a great habit to get into so you can nest when you need to, and flip between matching delimiters in your editor.
May
12
comment How to create a Linux Media Server using Ubuntu?
@Dan: You're agreeing with me. Reread what I wrote - it's from when this was on SO, and it says that this is better for superuser than for serverfault. (A couple people had voted to move it to serverfault, and I was trying to encourage it to end up here instead.)
Apr
28
comment How to create a Linux Media Server using Ubuntu?
Definitely doesn't belong here - since this is more of a lightweight server question (looking for just a canned program or set of programs to quickly set up, not really deal with administration issues) I actually think it's a better fit for superuser than serverfault.
Apr
14
comment Killing all instances of Chrome on the command-line?
It's also always polite to start with SIGTERM before escalating to SIGKILL.
Apr
14
answered Killing all instances of Chrome on the command-line?
Apr
14
comment Killing all instances of Chrome on the command-line?
Is there any reason to use ps ... | instead of pgrep, even supposing you don't want to use pkill?
Apr
7
comment Linux bash: when to use egrep instead of grep?
Whether you call it egrep or grep -E, extended regular expressions do generally make complex patterns shorter and therefore easier to read by removing a lot of ``. It's not about performance, but is a better way in some sense.
Mar
28
comment Local User Login Script Fedora Linux
By login script do you mean something like .bash_profile for bash?