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Sep
28
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
comment Why does RAM have to be volatile?
Because a non-volatile RAM would be called SSD.
Aug
12
comment RAM ticking all the time on Linux box
@Sevenearths: No, because my RAM doesn't make a sound when it's being accessed.
Aug
12
revised Using git to take over the management of half synchronized text file directories
added 87 characters in body
Aug
12
answered Using git to take over the management of half synchronized text file directories
Jul
25
comment What is the exact use of a MAC address?
@MarkHenderson: IMO, saying that we need MAC and IP because MAC is layer 2 and IP is layer 3 is just like saying "we need it because we had designed internet to be that way", it misses the point and gives no useful information whatsoever. What I'm answering here is why both factory-assigned and dynamically-assigned identifier are necessary due to the nature of the problem, and what entails from an internet stack without either (loss of routing efficiency for no dynamically-assigned ID and difficulty of uniquely addressing a device before dynamic ID assignment for no factory-assigned ID).
Jul
25
comment What is the exact use of a MAC address?
@MarkHenderson: My point is that MAC belonging to Ethernet and IP to TCP/IP is pretty much a historical accident; theoretically, if we redesigned the entire internet stack from scratch (and ignore OSI and compatibility with other networks), it would be possible to replace most uses of factory-assigned number (e.g. MAC) with dynamically-assigned number (e.g. IP), except that there are a number of packets that need to be sent/received before a dynamically-assigned number can be acquired, which is why a factory-assigned globally unique identifier is necessary.
Jul
24
revised What is the exact use of a MAC address?
added 10 characters in body
Jul
24
answered What is the exact use of a MAC address?
Apr
30
revised Collating scanned PDFs from 2 folders
added 3269 characters in body
Apr
30
answered Collating scanned PDFs from 2 folders
Apr
27
comment Blue screen of death while installing Windows XP SP2
Windows XP? At this day and age? Would you consider running Linux instead? If there is any software you use that actually need to run on Windows XP, I'd recommend using virtual machines (e.g. Virtual Box or VMWare) on a more modern machine instead of holding on to an old hardware.
Apr
27
revised Is it possible to restrict modeline in vim to only allow certain settings?
added 115 characters in body
Apr
27
answered Is it possible to restrict modeline in vim to only allow certain settings?
Apr
27
revised How dangerous is partitioning my drive for Linux?
added 302 characters in body
Apr
27
answered How dangerous is partitioning my drive for Linux?
Apr
27
comment Is it slower to copy two files at the same time than to copy one after the other?
In addition, if you're transferring over USB2, then there probably won't be any differences; typical harddisk read speed is around 50-100MB/s while the maximum speed of USB2 is 32MB/s, so the bottleneck is likely going to be the USB port rather than harddisk characteristic due to buffering. In other words, it's difficult to say one way or the other.
Apr
27
comment Is it slower to copy two files at the same time than to copy one after the other?
I think this question could benefit from an actual benchmark, rather than the educated guesses by most of the answerers here. Anyone had a spinning disk and some spare time? I believe for SSD, the differences is likely to be negligible; while for harddisk, I believe the answer could range from major performance penalty to possibly slight benefit depending on the number and sizes of the files and the relative performance of the source and target disks (if they're different).
Apr
25
revised Sudo su vs su linux
su can also switch to users other than root
Apr
25
comment Sudo su vs su linux
One other important bit of information to understand the related command sudo su otheruser is that su allows the root to switch into any users without entering their password, while non-root users that runs su have to input the target user's password. sudo su therefore runs su as root, which allows you to get a shell for another user without knowing their password (as long as it's allowed by sudoers).