438 reputation
216
bio website somethinkodd.com/oddthinking
location Sydney, Australia
age
visits member for 5 years, 4 months
seen Dec 12 at 18:05

I'm a software developer (currently focused on Python), living in Australia (currently focused on Sydney).

I am an on-again/off-again moderator of Skeptics.SE. (I was Pro Tem Moderator, I handed in my diamond when the first elections were held, and then ran in the second elections about a year later.)


Mar
7
comment Windows 7 mirrored volume fails during testing of fail-over mode
The Technet article is interesting, but seems to support my expectations. "A mirrored volume is provides fault tolerance by duplicating data on two disks. If one disk fails, the data on the failed disk becomes unavailable, but the system continues to operate using the unaffected disk." <- This isn't happening! "If a basic disk containing part of a mirrored volume is disconnected or fails, the status of the mirrored volume becomes Failed Redundancy and the disk status remains Online" <- This isn't happening!
Mar
7
comment Windows 7 mirrored volume fails during testing of fail-over mode
The third link describes someone who is having a similar problem to me on Windows 2003, but offers no solution. I am not using an Intel-based solution (I was explaining I have in the past which is where I got my expectations of a automatic fail-over.)
Mar
7
comment Windows 7 mirrored volume fails during testing of fail-over mode
Psycogeek: Thank you very much for your response. Some parts of the answer are not relevant to my problem. You describe a mechanism for protecting against viruses and user problems. That is a separate problem. RAID-1 is NOT the same as a back-up (let alone an off-site backup). I am not using it for that purpose. I am using it to protect against a single-point of hardware failure.
Mar
7
comment Windows 7 mirrored volume fails during testing of fail-over mode
@Psychogeek: That question would require quite a reboot (and a camera) to answer, so I don't have that info yet. It is all pretty straightforward though. The two relevant drives plug straight into the RAID-supporting motherboard (ASUS P8Z68-V Pro/Gen3) using SATA II. (The C: drive is an SSD and does likewise).
May
15
comment Can zipping a file break it?
Thanks, @Bora, but I have no such misunderstanding. I realise zipping doesn't affect the actual data in the file. I am suggesting an "external" cause that may fool people into thinking the zip damaged their files and directories. I have been caught in the past by restoring zipped up backups, only to find that my applications no longer worked, because they depend on meta-data I didn't bring across. (Not a basic misunderstanding on my part, but merely an oversight.)
Feb
16
comment Can you disable the Ctrl-S (XOFF) keystroke in Putty?
That should be stty -ixon.
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
Ha! So the analogy here is between someone who wouldn't mind seeing a movie without paying and someone who is starving? My god, the MPAA have a moral obligation to ensure EVERYONE sees EVERY MOVIE! Why must so many people in need suffer this way?
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
First part is a strong point. The second part doesn't address the issue of whether DRM is viable. It also doesn't address the way the market works. For 10 cents, I would happily buy a book I could only read 3 times, or on Tuesdays only. Heck, I often pay for a newspaper with more words than a book that I only partly read and then throw away.
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
I think the second point is quite key. However, many of the answers here ignore the non-intuitive practicalities of reverse-engineering a code from a chip.
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
Your second argument is empty rhetoric arguing against the concepts of copyright in general, not against DRM. Intellectual Property does not work the same as normal property. The closest analogy, from the perspective of the copyright owner, is someone who steals apples, not someone who shares them.
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
The first argument has just converted the question from "Does the perfect DRM exist?" to "Does the perfect lock exists?" I am not sure that is any more easy for a typical person to understand. For most people, locks are perceived as something that DOES work.
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
... and that is why heavier-than-air machines will never fly. (It isn't a particularly strong argument that DRM is impossible. It is a strong argument that DRM is very hard.)
Aug
27
comment How can I explain why DRM cannot work?
This argument isn't very convincing. It contains an "appeal to authority" (I don't cares what some guy called Gabe thinks, I care why he thinks it.) It also begs the question by commenting on "When software is cracked..." but that doesn't address the question of whether it is possible to make crack-proof DRM.
Jun
25
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
Thanks, ak2. These examples are all about trying to make the shell itself act like Windows, which I regard pretty much as a lost cause. You have described a number of hurdles to jump over that I hadn't even considered, but it just goes to reinforce my view that this is the wrong way to achieve consistency. Instead, I am looking for a Windows application that allows editing of a Windows-like text-box, and then sends the result through to the terminal.
Jun
11
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
Still solving the wrong problem I am afraid. I transfer the files through Mercurial over SSH. I could equally use one of the above suggestions. Either way, once the files are transferred, (a) I want to run them, and (b) I want to cut-and-paste snippets of the output. That's when the problems start - I need a command-line terminal window. And I would like one that supports Windows L&F.
Jun
11
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
Oh, I see what you are proposing. I am developing the code locally, where the code (and, more importantly, the editor) runs much faster, deploying (via a config management system) to a server on the other side of the world (lag!) for staging and production. So I need a remote command line, not a remote editor.
Jun
11
comment Make windows vista file explorer act normally
Note sure why the override doesn't work. I've added another step to the answer - see if that works. Note sure which of the (large number of) menu bar, title bar, preview pane, navigation pane, details pane or other guff you are referring to by "favourites links". I don't seem to see "favourites" on my machine, so there is hope!
Jun
10
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
@akira, the difference between (terminal-based emacs) look-and-feel and the Windows look-and-feel is more than a few key-bindings. They have fundamental differences in the way they treat buffers and text. In any case, the command-line is my concern (unless you are suggesting running the command line through emacs?) Maybe I should be writing my own solution. It doesn't sound too hard. (Famous last words!)
Jun
9
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
@Akira, I've been reading the mintty manual, to see if I should accept this answer. I saw the Shift+Insert, and maybe 15 years ago, when I was still using that shortcut, I would have been satisfied with it, but these days it would probably be equally frustrating as PuTTY. I might give it a try anyway (and I have +1'd your answer).
Jun
9
comment SSH client and Command Prompt replacements Windows look-and-feel
Powershell has a more powerful language, but the editor is just as bad as Command Shell. I do use a remote editor occasionally (emacs rather than vim, but let's not go there) and it just makes the problem worse. Most of my editing is done in dozens of other apps which accept Windows short-cuts (such as the browser I am using now). Sudden CTRL+V to paste makes it emacs page-down. :-(