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Jul
1
comment Where do I find the Google Drive icon?
Clear! Thank you "dude"
Jul
1
comment Where do I find the Google Drive icon?
@Ramhound: duDE fix the problem ;)
Jul
1
accepted Where do I find the Google Drive icon?
Jul
1
asked Where do I find the Google Drive icon?
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
4
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
31
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
8
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
27
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
31
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
31
accepted How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
Jul
31
comment How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
So using 32bit fp in a 16bit system is crazy. Why using 64bit fp in a 32bit system isn't?
Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
31
comment How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
No I don't mind so in deep, just curious :) You are talking about memory here... but it will increase the time for the operations? (so the load of the CPU)
Jul
31
comment How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
But if I use 32bit floating point values into a 16bit system (or 64 bit floating point values into a 32 bit system) it requires only more memory (since it must twice registers)? Or processing the information will add overhead, so will take more time?
Jul
31
comment How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
I'm curious: using a 80bit floating point (or 64 bit floating point) in a CPU without special registers (such as the ones dedicated to 80bit floating point), just 32-bit lenght, require more time in elaboration? (since it must allocate more registers for doing operations). Or just require more memory? (for the 64-bit fp, for example, it requires 2 register of 32-bit).
Jul
30
awarded  Yearling
Jul
30
asked How can a 80-bit floating point be used by a 32-bit system?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Sep
19
awarded  Popular Question