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Jan
26
comment Why are processes in Windows 8 32 bit?
@Mehrdad, the usual penalty of 64 bit is slightly larger memory footprint, with better computational speed. This is why google and others have been pushing lately for a hybrid ABI that is 64 bit but with only 32 bit pointers, so you get the best of both worlds. The only time you will see a loss of computational speed with 64 bit is if you are doing a LOT of pointer manipulation and the 64 bit pointers don't fit in the L1 cache.
Jan
26
comment Why are processes in Windows 8 32 bit?
@Dan-o, 64 bit also gains some computational speed, not just memory access. For applications that are properly written in the first place, the only effort it takes to port them to 64 bit is recompiling them with a 64 bit compiler. Proprietary software vendors however, are notorious for writing bad code, and being too lazy to even bother recompiling, despite the fact that microsoft's SDK has easily supported non i386 architectures for well over 15 years.
Jan
26
answered Why are processes in Windows 8 32 bit?
Jan
26
comment Why are processes in Windows 8 32 bit?
This doesn't answer the question.
Jan
26
answered Does RM corrupt when interrupted?
Jan
25
comment How could I limit or even disable file cache on Windows Server 2008R2?
@JanSchejbal, that's the setting I could no longer remember due to the fact that I gave up on Windows a few years ago. Normally the kernel tries to swap out pages from processes that have been idle for some time because that memory can be better put to use caching files for active processes. That setting makes it more aggressive at this.
Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
answered How can I find routers that support external drives larger than 2TB?
Dec
29
awarded  Self-Learner
Dec
26
comment How to rebuild a Li Ion laptop battery?
You will want to use cells with the same capacity as the original, and replace them all, not just some. Replacing some cells with different capacity will cause the weaker ones to drag down the whole pack, and possibly cause reverse discharge of the others, ruining them quickly. Even if the replacements have the same stated capacity, the old one will have less capacity due to their age.
Dec
26
answered DC output rating on laptop charger
Dec
26
comment DC output rating on laptop charger
Umm.. the difference is that one is 20v and the other is only 19. This may be close enough to work, or may not.
Dec
26
comment EFI System Partition and unallocated space?
@Jordan, no reason.
Dec
26
comment EFI System Partition and unallocated space?
@Jordan, It will be unallocated.
Dec
26
comment GRUB broken after conversion to btrfs
You need to reinstall grub, which is covered by plenty of other questions this could be duped against.
Dec
26
answered EFI System Partition and unallocated space?
Dec
4
comment Free Space not shown in partiton even after extending it through gparted
of course, that is the usual way one runs it.
Dec
3
comment Does a hard drive degrade if we always write to the same directory?
@FrankThomas, no, I am talking about fragmentation of the directory itself, which is why I keep saying "directory fragmentation".
Dec
3
comment Does a hard drive degrade if we always write to the same directory?
@FrankThomas, yes, they do. Directories are files too. A directory that slowly has files added to it over time will grow larger, and the added blocks may not follow the older ones, hence, directory fragmentation.
Dec
3
comment Does a hard drive degrade if we always write to the same directory?
@FrankThomas, windows seems to be very good at fragmenting the heck out of files even when first created, and even if there is plenty of contiguous free space, but again, it's the directory we are talking about here, not the files.