417 reputation
312
bio website zsolt.botykai.org
location Budapest, Hungary
age 41
visits member for 5 years, 4 months
seen Oct 13 at 9:11
Linux, basketball, reading, music (jazz), family, regex, Vim, Shell CLI addict. Not in this order. Having a beautiful daughter, expeccting a son, within 2 weeks, as I'm writiing this.

Jun
9
comment Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
That did not work :-(
Jun
9
comment Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
It does not work :-( (I'm on a Lenovo 3000 N200 which has no END only key, but with a "Fn" key. So I had pressed "CTRTL ALT SHIFT FN END", without luck.
Jun
9
awarded  Critic
Jun
9
comment Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
But that's brings up the middle servers' task manager/password change function (as mentioned in the question).
Jun
9
revised Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
one of the answers does not work.
Jun
9
comment Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
Nope, I'm part of a domain, so it says I should hit CTRL+ALT+DELETE.
Jun
9
asked Change windows XP password via (2nd) remote desktop
Jan
21
comment Linux find folder inside subfolders
Only if you have slocate installed. Some production environment does not :-(
Jan
21
answered Linux find folder inside subfolders
Sep
13
awarded  Commentator
Sep
13
comment Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Fsck found it: most probably it was some filesystem error. The somedir directory was moved to lost+found. Now we are testing the disk for more errors.
Sep
13
accepted Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Sep
6
revised Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
lsattr and strace output
Sep
6
comment Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Here is the output: gist.github.com/566947
Sep
6
comment Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Did so, except the reboot/fsck cycle (as I'm not allowed to do so). The find also not found somewhere. I can create the the new somedir directory, and can link to it. I can't create a somewhere dir, as it complains, the file already exists. I can link to somewhere as well, and after an ls -l I can see a listing where there is a link to a directory within the same parent, and can't see the target.
Sep
6
awarded  Promoter
Sep
3
comment Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
It's mentioned in the question: ext3 on an emc disk system.
Sep
3
revised Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Automount checked.
Sep
3
comment Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Thanks for the Maxwell's demon link, interesting read, and the automount explanation is a possibility. Yet, I assume, if I change to somewhere, then issue a mount|grep somewhere and it's mounted at that time, it should be listed, which is not the case.
Sep
2
revised Why does “ls -a” hide some existing directory from the root user?
Some more test and session info.