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May
8
comment Should I use an SSD or HDD to hash lots of data?
Hashing a file usually involves copying it into memory, then performing work on it. Likewise, copying a file usually involves copying it into memory, then placing it somewhere else on the disk. Point being, if you are comparing simply hashing the files in-place or copying them to an SSD first, you're putting the same amount of "wear" on the HDD, regardless of what option you choose. It would probably be faster if you just hashed them in place, saving the time of copying them to the SSD first.
May
5
comment What are threads, and what do they do in the processor?
@Donato the operating system interrupts any running threads to allow the others some time to complete their work. At any given moment only 8 threads are running on the CPU, and each core is constantly switching between different threads; it's helpful to think of them as "jobs" (keeping in mind jobs can also be assigned a priority). Each core will do some work for a given thread, and then is interrupted by the operating system's task scheduler to move onto a different job, do some work on that job, and so on and so fourth, until the job is completed.
Mar
31
comment Is there a virus that can cause a computer to catch on fire or diodes to reverse?
Possible duplicate of Can some software physically damage hardware?
Mar
31
comment Is there any way to distribute x264 encoding jobs across multiple computers (to increase the encoding speed)?
@GroovyDotCom well in addition to that, all the supporting software (e.g. a server to initiate the splitting filter, distribute it to all the client nodes running encoders, queue the jobs, transfer the files back to the main server, and re-merge the result) still needs to be dealt with, and this still doesn't address any potential quality/efficiency issues with the method of encoding a large video in individual segments. Also note that this question is nearly six years old at this point, so I'm sure a lot has changed since then too with respect to distributed encoding.
Mar
28
comment Virtual Memory and SSD
@endolith I didn't say to disable the page/swapfile. It should just be placed on another disk if possible - preferably a spinning, mechanical HDD, as they don't have a finite number of write cycles (unlike flash-based solid state drives, where using it for virtual memory would accelerate the wear on the drive).
Feb
23
comment PC hangs a lot due to physical memory usage
At this point, you're basically starving the computer for available resources. There's not much you can do except keep monitoring your memory usage, ensuring that you close any program(s) consuming a lot of memory completely before switching to another application. Your pagefile should be an adequate size already, as your computer isn't giving you any "out-of-memory" issues, although the fact that the pagefile has to be relied on in this case is why the thrashing occurs. Just remember, memory is fairly cheap, and even going from 1GB to 2GB would improve the situation dramatically.
Feb
23
comment Unable to open Python GUI application
Did you add the folder with python.exe to your PATH environment variable?
Feb
23
comment How do I know if an optical drive is able to read CAV written DVD?
@user2284570 In that case, can you share with us the particular model of TV DVD Recorder you used to originally make the discs?
Feb
23
comment How do I know if an optical drive is able to read CAV written DVD?
@user2284570 Can you provide the details on the particular model of TV DVD Recorder you were using? At this point I'm willing to argue it's the way your particular discs were mastered, and there was a different copy protection mechanism in place.
Feb
23
comment How do I know if an optical drive is able to read CAV written DVD?
It doesn't make raw read attempts report as bad, it's to allow low-level access to the burst-cutting area. And disk capacity can only be obtained in the case the DVD has a valid filesystem that can be read by the operating system you're using (which is irrelevant in the Nintento case). And again, in the same article you linked to, it's further doubted that CLV/CAV has anything to do at all with copyright infringement, let alone your ability to read the data. Again, a DVD drive does not care how physically long a 0 and a 1 are in a given track.
Feb
23
comment How do I know if an optical drive is able to read CAV written DVD?
Also, from the same Wikipedia page you linked, it is still apparent that CAV/CLV is irrelevant here. GameCube discs are encrypted and obfuscated, but can still be read by most PC DVD drives. See this article for details the encryption/obfuscation algorithm, which requires a DVD drive with the ability to dump the read-error buffer. This particular method uses the error correcting data in the DVD itself as part of the encryption/obfuscation method.
Feb
23
comment How do I know if an optical drive is able to read CAV written DVD?
@user2284570 not only can I can find several tutorials for backing up both Gamecube and Wii discs using a PC DVD drive, I have done it myself. While you do require a drive that supports specific hardware commands (in particular, the vendor-specific command to dump the read error buffer), not on the drive's capability to use CLV/CAV: "The data comes through Raw from the drive (scrambled by the scrambling key) but RawDump determines the seeds on the fly to produce an unscrambled ISO."
Jan
16
comment Windows 10 Tech Preview error: “Windows cannot be installed on MBR disks”. My hard drive is GPT. Why am I getting this error?
On most new laptops with UEFI I've tried, I've had a lot of trouble installing Windows off of a USB key - I've had luck by copying the install files to the HDD itself and then launching setup again from there, or by using a DVD, however.
Jan
6
comment How to install Xibo Client on Raspberry Pi Model B?
We can help you if you provide us more information... The output after running the script with the error message would be particularly useful.
Dec
28
comment How to lock a file in Windows?
Nice answer. For the curious, here's the MSDN link to the File::Open method detailing the parameters of the call (specifically, the last argument, 'None', declines sharing the file with any other threads/processes - and likewise, provisions exist to lock the file for read/write only, or a combination thereof).
Dec
28
comment Optimal location of pagefile on a system with two SSDs, with system drive faster than secondary drive
@cybernard has the right idea. If it ever gets to the point where you're paging out to disk, the system is going to be as slow as a turtle, regardless if your pagefile is on an SSD or an HDD. Yes the SSD is faster than the HDD, but both are orders of magnitude slower than RAM to begin with, and given the finite lifespan of current SSD technology, I'd avoid the unnecessary writes-to-disk and instead use the HDD. Put another way, if you're paging to disk, making the pagefile slightly faster is not going to help - getting more RAM will.
Dec
28
comment Will buying a higher output PSU help make my GPU run cooler?
Related: Is it ok to run a system with a PSU that idles at only 10% of its capacity?
Dec
16
comment How to install libav-tools in centos 6
From the error log, you need to install an assembler (e.g. yasm), or compile with the --disable-asm flag.
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between GDDR3 and DDR3?
The actual GDDR3 spec is based off the DDR3 memory specification, but there are indeed changes to make the memory more suitable for a hardware device as opposed to being part of the system memory (e.g. hardware reset capability, increased ability to dissipate heat, as the memory is fixed/soldered and not removable). The Samsung catalog for a surface-mounted GDDR3 module covers a good number of these differences.
Dec
9
comment What is the value of MD5 checksums if the MD5 hash itself could potentially also have been manipulated?
I like this answer because it highlights a fundamental part of a checksum - it's simply one metric, of many, to check the validity of a file's contents. If the network itself is untrusted, it's not that unfeasible to imagine one replacing the MD5-hashes and patching binaries on the fly (as we've already seen on some Tor exit nodes)... Of course then, MD5 provides no protection against deliberately modified files because you're already placing your trust in the provider of said files to begin with.