7,064 reputation
922
bio website geekosaur.dreamwidth.org
location Akron, OH
age 50
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Oct 6 '12 at 15:22

Twitter: geekosaur

(back online although still looking...)

I'm an old-time Unix/Usenet geek; you can get a good idea of my checkered past by searching for my name in Google Groups. (Include the first name, though, or you'll get my cousin Russ (http://www.eyrie.org/~rra)....)

Presently I am unemployed and looking at jobs in the Toronto area. Most recently I was a senior system administrator for Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, a department of the Carnegie Institute of Technology half of CMU. Most of my work is infrastructure — the stuff most people don't notice unless it's broken. My job is to make sure people continue to not notice it.

I have been suffering from gradually worsening sinus problems for the past 10 years, and I was recently diagnosed with dysphoric bipolar syndrome. A fair amount of this journal is about the latter. More recent items are tagged so they can be avoided. I may at some point go back and fix the earlier ones.

In the 90s (that is, before the dysphoric bipolar got bad enough that I had trouble focusing in projects) I was involved with a number of open source projects. I'm starting to find my way back into the open source world now that I'm regaining reliable control of my faculties.


Apr
15
answered sound detection accessing device node directly
Apr
14
answered Why does HP Update at remote system trigger RDP printing at local system?
Apr
13
answered Change keyboard mapping (Input Source) from terminal in OS X
Apr
13
comment How Can I Create A Dump File of Running Process in Linux
By reading it? I can't run the command for you...
Apr
13
comment How Can I Create A Dump File of Running Process in Linux
lehman.cuny.edu/cgi-bin/man-cgi?gcore or install it using your system's package manager and do man gcore.
Apr
13
answered How Can I Create A Dump File of Running Process in Linux
Apr
13
comment When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
I would not advise doing it when the system is already booted, because while the system should catch you trying to mount / a second time, sometimes things go wrong. Trying to use it for removable media has the opposite problem: the system will want that media to be present at boot time. "it is run at boot time" means exactly what it says, any filesystem marked auto will be mounted at boot time, including removable media. It will also be marked as system-mounted, not user-mounted, meaning your USB key (if it was plugged in) can only be umounted by root.
Apr
13
comment When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
The point is that mount -a is run at boot time, so whatever else you might want to do with it, you must expect that it will also happen at boot. This is why you should probably not try to use it yourself. And I said specific filesystem types, not specific filesystems: this means filesystems whose fstype field is nfs or ext2 or etc.
Apr
13
comment When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
You can use -a with specific filesystem types, but you'd have to distinguish then between mount at boot and your possible use. Don't try to use -a for your own uses; consider it part of the OS scaffolding.
Apr
13
comment using VIM distributed with OSX
I don't understand what you're asking.
Apr
13
comment using VIM distributed with OSX
What is confusing about it? vim filename from a terminal, just as on Linux or etc..
Apr
13
revised When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
further clarification
Apr
13
revised When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
better (*any*) punctuation and markup
Apr
13
answered When/Why do you use mount -a over auto?
Apr
11
answered Removing Battery and running the laptop in pluged in mode?
Apr
11
answered What exactly is OSX doing during the “Optimizing system” step of software installation?
Apr
10
answered Modified .bash_profile and now I can't even use ls
Apr
9
answered Subshell arguments in -exec parameter for find(1)
Apr
9
comment Recursively count files matching pattern in directory in zsh
zsh kinda defies "simple"; it's got a lot of functionality and it's hard to describe most of it simply.
Apr
9
comment Why does grep return no results (list all files in directory)
egrep is the original; grep -E is a GNUism. Also a GNUism is that you can use escaping instead: grep '\.\(cpp\|h\)'. Neither is portable.