250 reputation
318
bio website scottseverance.us
location Dallas, Texas, USA
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Oct 14 at 21:09

My first Linux experience was in 1998 (via telnet into my university's server to read my email with PINE). I've run Linux on my own machines off and on since 1999 and exclusively since 2006.

My first distro was Slackware, which I quickly broke. I then went back to Windows 95. After that, my friend helped me install Debian, which I used until I replaced that machine. I found Debian too difficult to install on my own, so I put Red Hat on my newer machine. At that time, yum didn't exist, and Red Hat only offered updates if I logged in to X as root, which I rarely did. So, it quickly became outdated, and OpenOffice 1.1 couldn't handle right-to-left text, which I needed for one of my university classes. So, I started using my Windows XP laptop most of the time. I couldn't install Linux on the laptop because the NTFS tools of the era couldn't resize my partition.

After a couple of years, I decided to switch my Red Hat box to something more modern. I wanted to move away from the RPM package format, so I tried installing Debian again and once again found it too complicated to get all the features I needed. Then, I read about an up and coming Debian-based distro called Ubuntu that had just released their latest version. So, I installed 6.06 (Dapper Drake) and have used Ubuntu exclusively as my main OS all my machines since that time. I only boot into Windows a few times a year. I've tried a few other distros' live CDs, but so far have always decided that the benefits of those distros aren't significant enough for me to switch over.

For the first many years, I used the command line most of the time, as early Linux GUIs weren't up to many basic tasks. These days, the GUI tools have made leaps and bounds and are quite usable. Nevertheless, I often prefer the command line for many tasks. I'm much more likely to use vim than Gedit. But, I quite appreciate GUI tools for a number of tasks--perhaps most tasks these days.


Jun
6
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
31
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
27
comment How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
It does appear to be using navigator.userAgent. However, it's clearly using something else in addition. I've verified multiple ways that my user agent string is in fact being changed, yet the problem persists. So, much as I'd like it to be so, changing the user agent isn't the answer--or at least isn't the complete answer.
Nov
27
revised How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
added 47 characters in body
Nov
27
comment How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
Note: The Javascript is minified and trying to step through it in the debugger is painfully slow, never mind that minified code is really difficult to understand. Also, I've edited the question to link to the site at issue.
Nov
27
comment How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
@Hashbrown: Reading through the source, it appears to be using navigator.userAgent and grepping for linux. However, since I'm spoofing the user agent string, my navigator.userAgent is now Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.2; WOW64; rv:21.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/21.0 yet the site still knows somehow that I'm on Linux.
Nov
27
comment How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
@Abhishek: Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately, that only allows the user agent string to be spoofed, which doesn't help in this case.
Nov
27
revised How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
added 37 characters in body
Nov
27
awarded  Yearling
Nov
27
asked How can I make my browser lie about my operating system?
Apr
23
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
26
awarded  Organizer
Dec
29
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
26
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
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comment Latest Ubuntu Desktop without Unity
In fairness, I should note that the version of Unity in Ubuntu 12.04 has a richer interface for finding Apps whose names you don't know than the traditional way. You can filter by the same categories, as well as filtering by rating. Furthermore, if you want to search, that option is there as well. The current version of Unity is far better then the early releases. In summary, the current Unity is actually better for the purposes you described than the classic menus.
Sep
27
reviewed Reviewed Using Google Music Manager in Linux from the command line
Sep
27
awarded  Custodian
Sep
27
comment Access to certain files but not others
Can you provide a few more specifics? How are you sharing the files? SMB? NFS? Something else? Also, can you be more specific about the permissions, error messages received, etc.? I don't think that there's enough key information in your post to be able to diagnose the problem.
Sep
26
suggested rejected edit on Linux RHEL : Making disk image efficiently
Sep
26
comment When I ssh into a ubuntu machine, what kind of shell am I using
So, if you use chsh to change the default shell, of course the change will be visible after rebooting, just like if I save a file, the change will be visible after rebooting. But rebooting isn't what applies the change. Any login shell will notice the change. That means you can log out and back in, or reboot, or run gnome-terminal -x bash -l, or use one of many other methods.