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Oct
12
awarded  Commentator
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
I haven't looked into the specifics of password protected ISOs, but, virus writers aren't generally too concerned about the original content. That said, with an encrypted ZIP file, you can still read the file descriptors, just not the file data itself. If the password protected ISO allows that, then it's trivial to engineer an identical "looking" ISO that will infect the system as soon as it's opened. Virus Wins, user loses their data. ISO != Write Protection
Oct
12
comment Corruption-resistant file system that works across Windows and OSX?
Wow, I'm behind the curve... thought exFAT was some new name for Fat32. :-P
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
@Untraceable Your point is simply that opening the ISO file when it's password protected, and gaining access to the content is impossible without the password. I understand this point, but my point is that the ISO can simply be overwritten, with, or without the password, and so your point about data safety, and "read-only" isn't accurate. The content of the ISO may not be re-writable without the password, but the ISO itself most certainly can be overwritten. Lastly, if I can read the original content, I most certainly can engineer a replacement ISO with modified content.
Oct
12
awarded  Teacher
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
How about this as a thought experiment: ISOs are files right? What prevents me from overwriting it with another ISO file of the same name, and different content? (say, a virus infected version of the previous content?) There is NOTHING PREVENTING THAT, and that's my point. You are wrong, and I expect a coffee now.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
I disagree. Any file on a hard disk most certainly can be written to unless access to the file is prevented in some manner (inadequate permissions, read-only flag enforced by the OS which cannot be overridden in software, etc) Your statement above is dangerously inaccurate and could lead some poor person to think they are better protected than they are.
Oct
12
answered Corruption-resistant file system that works across Windows and OSX?
Oct
12
answered Acceptable temperature range of hard drives
Oct
12
comment Blanking/changing Mac OS X password in Linux
Agreed, this is very straightforward to do from the OSX installer.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
ISOs are files, and are not immune to damage from viruses. Inversely, if an ISO file is damaged by a virus, you may very well lose all the data in the image, but this all depends on what the virus does. There is NO CONNECTION between virus safety and ISO formatting unless it's written to ROM media.
Oct
12
answered Using PostgreSQL on Mac OS X Lion
Oct
12
answered Is BCCing e-mails guaranteed to be reliable?
May
6
awarded  Supporter
Apr
26
comment Why aren't all CPUs 'overclocked' as a factory default?
@Jeff Ahh, so my knowledge is a little dated. Thanks for the update, I'm sure other readers will find that tidbit useful as well.
Apr
26
comment Why aren't all CPUs 'overclocked' as a factory default?
@VarLogRant you've just described Dynamic Frequency Scaling, (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_frequency_scaling) which many modern CPUs, especially for mobile devices, do. Power consumption is effectively a function of clock speed (since CMOS circuitry consumes very little power when in a static state) and so for mobile chips this is an invaluable tool to conserve power.
Apr
26
comment Why aren't all CPUs 'overclocked' as a factory default?
I've read that Intel does this for the "Core" series of processors. They manufacture the Core processors as two cores on a single die. If one of the chips tests bad, they disable it, and sell the die as a Core Solo. Two viable Core Duo chips are sealed in the same enclosure to make a Core Extreme. In this way, Intel is salvaging their otherwise defective stock, and ensuring that the defect rate for Core Extreme chips is effectively zero.
Apr
20
awarded  Autobiographer