310 reputation
16
bio website charleschappell.com
location Tokyo, Japan
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jul 16 at 7:58

An IT pro from California who learned Japanese was harder than C, and never went home.


Jun
10
comment What happens when an SSD wears out?
@Ark-kun Fair enough, but I don't consider the failure mode of either to be "graceful" personally. Having the OS brick for a power user, isn't as big a deal as it is for your standard consumer. This is why a good, and ideally mostly transparent to the user, backup system is an absolute must, and why I refuse to acknowledge "graceful" failure modes. Without a backup, there's no way to be sure you're not going to lose data.
Jun
9
comment What happens when an SSD wears out?
@Ark-kun I have said nothing to the contrary, however, in my experience, end users tend to put up with the finickiness of their computers while the HDD fails, up until an OS Update is required. When that happens, the multiple write errors brick the OS and make the computer fail to boot. HDDs handle bad sector relocation internally by now. (1 bad sector) If you're seeing data errors, the HDD has already run out of spare relocation sectors, and you're already staring down the "many bad sector" scenario. That's where SMART can help, because it warns when relocation sectors are running low.
Oct
28
comment What happens when an SSD wears out?
@Tobu, it would be great if all OSes popped up warnings and really alerted the user when a SMART failure was noticed, but even that is only about 50% according to Google and their massive experience with drive failure. I've seen both Windows and Mac OSX fail spectacularly during Software Updates with a failing drive. In neither case did SMART help or predict the failure. It's also pretty weak sauce to say "users who ignore it". USERS WILL! It's the SO or SD's responsibility to ensure that doesn't happen. Vista's incessant popups didn't help with the ignoring it problem either.
Oct
25
comment Convert many images to one PDF
+1 - My suggested solution as well. I've used this method to combine several PDFs by printing, then choosing "Save as PDF" from the print panel.
Oct
24
comment Why are the 'proc' and 'sys' folders more than 100 TB in size?
@ysap full of COMPRESSED text.
Oct
20
comment My MacBook Pro (2011) is dead
@DragonLord You sure about the "no damage" part of that? Many electronic devices will continue to function, even in a damaged state, only to fail later due to inexplicable circumstances. You might want to keep good notes about when that incident occurred, and any strange behavior from here on out.
Oct
18
comment What happens when an SSD wears out?
I object to the assertion that HDDs "degrade gracefully over time". In my experience, by the time they reach the failure mode that most people notice, they've been thrashed by the OS enough that data recovery is often quite difficult. The most common time I see HDD failures noticed is after running software updates, when the corruption affects the OS and in essence bricks the computer from the user's POV.
Oct
17
comment My MacBook Pro (2011) is dead
I had a device short the USB port of my 2009 MBP 17", and all it ended up doing was giving me an onscreen warning that it had disabled the USB port due to shorting, and please disconnect the device. Your experience is surprising given what I experienced. The device in question was a wireless headset with USB charging.
Oct
14
comment Is BCCing e-mails guaranteed to be reliable?
@Dan7119 Let me guess.. are you/were you a sysadmin too?
Oct
14
comment For complicated mathematic calculations, are extra threads or high-speed disk access more important?
+1 - But I would also recommend making sure the system has enough RAM as well. Make sure you have 8GB, not 4 in your system, (It really is barely enough under Lion) and spring for the faster CPUs unless you're going to be processing GB upon GB of data. (Drilling surveys, nuclear bomb simulations, that kind of thing) If you need more/faster storage later, you can always use an external box connected to Thunderbolt. CPU is impractical to change unless you're going for a Mac Pro.
Oct
14
comment What is the wi-spy usb hardware used for?
The short answer is yes, but remember that not all sources send at the same time, or with the same signal strength. The desired equipment may be able to "override" the strength of a farther away signal, or you may get perfect signal at some times and not others. Particularly insidious is that if you move away from the desired source (in the direction of the further away source) then your signal quality will degrade VERY FAST as your desired signal strength decreases, and the undesired source's strength increases.
Oct
13
comment Sending email from domain name address
+1 for a good answer, and the recommendation of Google Apps standard.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
I haven't looked into the specifics of password protected ISOs, but, virus writers aren't generally too concerned about the original content. That said, with an encrypted ZIP file, you can still read the file descriptors, just not the file data itself. If the password protected ISO allows that, then it's trivial to engineer an identical "looking" ISO that will infect the system as soon as it's opened. Virus Wins, user loses their data. ISO != Write Protection
Oct
12
comment Corruption-resistant file system that works across Windows and OSX?
Wow, I'm behind the curve... thought exFAT was some new name for Fat32. :-P
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
@Untraceable Your point is simply that opening the ISO file when it's password protected, and gaining access to the content is impossible without the password. I understand this point, but my point is that the ISO can simply be overwritten, with, or without the password, and so your point about data safety, and "read-only" isn't accurate. The content of the ISO may not be re-writable without the password, but the ISO itself most certainly can be overwritten. Lastly, if I can read the original content, I most certainly can engineer a replacement ISO with modified content.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
How about this as a thought experiment: ISOs are files right? What prevents me from overwriting it with another ISO file of the same name, and different content? (say, a virus infected version of the previous content?) There is NOTHING PREVENTING THAT, and that's my point. You are wrong, and I expect a coffee now.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
I disagree. Any file on a hard disk most certainly can be written to unless access to the file is prevented in some manner (inadequate permissions, read-only flag enforced by the OS which cannot be overridden in software, etc) Your statement above is dangerously inaccurate and could lead some poor person to think they are better protected than they are.
Oct
12
comment Blanking/changing Mac OS X password in Linux
Agreed, this is very straightforward to do from the OSX installer.
Oct
12
comment Is there any advantage to using ISO vs Folders for CD rips?
ISOs are files, and are not immune to damage from viruses. Inversely, if an ISO file is damaged by a virus, you may very well lose all the data in the image, but this all depends on what the virus does. There is NO CONNECTION between virus safety and ISO formatting unless it's written to ROM media.
Apr
26
comment Why aren't all CPUs 'overclocked' as a factory default?
@Jeff Ahh, so my knowledge is a little dated. Thanks for the update, I'm sure other readers will find that tidbit useful as well.