325 reputation
212
bio website ebonyfortress.com/blog
location Nottingham, United Kingdom
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen 12 hours ago
Professional game developer, with experience in C++, SQL, networking, concurrency, scripting, etc.

Feb
1
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Jan
13
awarded  Excavator
Jan
13
awarded  Editor
Jan
13
revised How can I retrieve a dump file after BSOD?
Removed dead link
Jan
13
suggested suggested edit on How can I retrieve a dump file after BSOD?
Jun
15
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Jul
21
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Jul
21
awarded  Constituent
Nov
13
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
I don't think there's much point given that people on that other thread just used Wikipedia to scare him about the 200 values which are actually just the factory defaults. Most of the values are exact 100s or 200s, as I remember. (The disk isn't attached currently or I'd be more certain.)
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Sorry to add a 3rd comment, but I just found this on the Seagate site, basically stating that their SMART values don't necessarily correspond to any well-known values and that you need to use their tool to interpret them (seagate.custkb.com/seagate/crm/selfservice/…) However their Seatools program said that the disk is fine.
Nov
12
awarded  Commentator
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Also, thanks for being the only person so far to have mentioned anything at all that distinguishes between disk errors and controller/cable errors, which is mostly what I was asking about!
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Where would I find a known good system? I don't have another disk of exactly the same make and the values themselves appear almost meaningless. The suspect disk has Ultra ATA CRC Error Count of 200, but says the 'worst' value for it is 171. And another disk of a different brand has 200/200 for those values, but has never exhibited any problems. So I don't think your "more than 2" rule applies here?
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Re: vagueness - the Seagate tools stated that every value was 'ok'. Another test I ran (though I can't remember which, sorry - might have been Ubuntu running the disk self test) said all the relevant values were "Always passing". The worst values had never crossed the threshold values in any case, apparently. The Windows 7 disk check has just given it a clean bill of health too so I'm really interested in seeing if something else is broken. Still, thanks for the links!
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
I know I need to replace something, but what? That's the question. Incidentally, a Western Digital was the only drive I ever had die within a couple of weeks of purchase so I won't touch them again. In 10 years this is the first Seagate I've had issues with - and it might actually be in perfect condition.
Nov
12
comment How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Ok, but that's not really answering my question - how do I find out what is actually broken? If I misdiagnose the problem then I risk damaging future data - and producing corrupted future backups as a result. There's no point me blindly taking copies of this disk on a daily basis if it turns out that something is silently corrupting it.
Nov
12
asked How to diagnose disk errors when disk appears to be ok?
Oct
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
12
comment Windows command prompt seemingly ignoring PATH
Good idea Harry - however I can't reproduce this today. I wish I'd kept a screenshot of yesterday's session however as I was 100% sure the behaviour was wrong. Will report back if I see it again.
Oct
11
comment Windows command prompt seemingly ignoring PATH
It won't launch anything in that directory unless I'm in it. The PATH environment variable is full of spaces (eg. in Program Files) and none of the existing paths in there are quoted - but the other paths in there seem to work fine. These include paths that Microsoft added via their own software, eg. C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Live\Shared.