196 reputation
4
bio website
location
age
visits member for 5 years
seen Aug 20 at 7:58

May
7
comment what is the hardware configuration required for the mac os 10.5.8 and mac os 10.6.2
@Kendall - all MacBooks can run 10.6, although they may not have originally shipped with enough RAM. 10.6 requires any Intel processor and 1GB RAM; and all Intel Macs can be upgraded to 2GB at least.
May
7
comment what is the hardware configuration required for the mac os 10.5.8 and mac os 10.6.2
I was answering the letter of the question if perhaps not the spirit. :)
May
7
comment what is the hardware configuration required for the mac os 10.5.8 and mac os 10.6.2
Leopard Assist is to help with installing 10.5 on older PPCs. There is no need for a tool to help install 10.6 on older Intels, because all Intel Macs are supported already.
May
7
answered what is the hardware configuration required for the mac os 10.5.8 and mac os 10.6.2
Dec
7
awarded  Teacher
Dec
7
answered Does my system support VT?
Oct
6
answered Install Mac OS 10.4.11 on Intel
Oct
6
answered Connect an Apple 24" LED Cinema Display to a PC
Sep
23
answered Windows print screen with Mac Keyboard
Sep
11
comment Upgrading a MacBook Air to an SSD?
Replacing the hard disk yourself will not void your warranty.
Sep
11
comment Why isn't iTunes 9 64-bit yet?
HFS+ supports hardlinks; it's what Time Machine uses.
Sep
11
comment Why isn't iTunes 9 64-bit yet?
Carbon isn't Classic, but it's more classic than Cocoa. Carbon will never be 64 bit though, yes.
Sep
11
comment Which should I install first, Windows XP or Windows 7?
XP Mode in Windows 7 is only supported on processors that have VT-x.
Aug
28
awarded  Supporter
Aug
28
comment Are Mac Minis suitable for a proper desktop computer?
The Mac mini does support two monitors at once. One monitor driven off the mini-DP socket can be a large, 30" 2560x1600 resolution display (via adaptor.) The other DVI socket is a single-link DVI port and so can only drive a screen of resolution up to 1920x1200, which is usually 24".
Jul
16
answered Killing the Windows Shell