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 Yearling
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May
13
answered Bash odd numbers
May
12
comment Running executable from Crontab
You might be able to see what is going on by redirecting stderr and stdout to a temp file from cron... "exim -bpc >>/tmp/crontest 2>&1" I suspect it has to do be something going wrong with that part of the command since you are getting an email. After that runs you can cat /tmp/crontest and see if there is anything there.
May
12
comment Running executable from Crontab
Well it's not at all inconceivable that it would run perfectly from a login shell and then fail from cron. But yeah, it's unlikely that cron does not have /usr/bin in its path. Sure, sorry that didn't help.
May
11
answered Running executable from Crontab
Jul
17
awarded  Yearling
Jul
17
comment Saving a process ID when detaching a command in Bash
Yeah, I think the problem is stdout is the output of the command you're running, but the id is coming from the shell. So to capture it with stdout you'd have to actually execute it in a subshell some how and capture the stdout of that. Just thinking out loud about what's going on, haven't tested that.
Jul
17
revised Copying a template header to multiple existing files
Added recursive option
Jul
17
answered Copying a template header to multiple existing files
Jul
17
awarded  Yearling
Jul
17
awarded  Editor
Jul
17
revised Saving a process ID when detaching a command in Bash
added 61 characters in body
Jul
17
answered Saving a process ID when detaching a command in Bash
Jul
14
comment Pipe with ls command
Sure! It's got many handy uses. You're only forwarding one argument to it at a time here, but you can control how multiple arguments are passed to the target command. By default multiple arguments would be interpreted as "ls -al arg1 arg2 arg3" but adding the flag -n1 limits it to one argument resulting in "ls -al arg1; ls -al arg2;..." Use the -t flag to experiment and see the output of the commands xargs generates.
Jul
14
awarded  Supporter
Jul
14
answered Pipe with ls command
Jul
14
answered Chrome “Sending request…” indefinitely
Jul
12
comment Make the table listing show entire fields
My pleasure! Glad to help!
Jul
12
comment How does SSL work? Isn't there a hole?
Thanks @Amazed, was looking for good references. @Ralph. It's just hard for people to even comprehend the size of the numbers involved. Computers are fast, but you very quickly run into the limits of the size of the number that a computer can handle in normal variables. After about 2^64 (a 20 digit number) you are left trying to manipulate string representations of the numbers which will really slow you down. The keys are 2^256 (78 digit numbers), theoretically you could count the number of atoms in the universe with a number that big.
Jul
12
comment How does SSL work? Isn't there a hole?
And just in case you think I was exaggerating... "Given all of today's computing power and available time — even a billion computers doing a billion checks a second — it is not possible to decipher the result of strong cryptography before the end of the universe." -from: pgpi.org/doc/pgpintro under the heading "Strong Cryptography"
Jul
12
comment How does SSL work? Isn't there a hole?
Exactly. I'm sure a sharp mathematician could give you something more specific, but given limited computer resources (As in, you don't have a 10000 node Linux cluster) There is no hope to do the calculations needed in a reasonable amount of time (as in, the time left before the sun is a charcoal briquette) Of course as computing power increases, perhaps it will be more feasible, but you will always run into cost/benefit problems. Even if you have the super computer, you have to make more money with the hack than it cost to set up the system and run it.