Reputation
Top tag
Next privilege 200 Rep.
See reduced ads
Badges
6
Impact
~4k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 3 votes cast
Dec
10
comment Do different positions of the antenna on a wireless router make any difference?
What would beam-forming change in antenna positionning?
Nov
4
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid Which is what I feel happens when we disable SWAP. It forces Windows to get rid of Disk Cache in lieu of Inactive Processes. I understand low and high priority, but I feel the user experience of a process loading up, versus a process loading a file is a worst experience. I'd rather wait for Word Doc to open or save, then wait for Word to restore itself.
Nov
4
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid Good to know that, I didn't. But I still find issue with the fact that it prioritizes caching disk over caching old process. Unless I understand this wrong. In the end, everything is data, but I feel process code is more important data, that needs to be fast to load. Where-as I/O, like files that the process modify or read through during execution isn't as high priority for me. I would prefer it to be Active + Inactive Process + Disk Cache, in that order. So when RAM is low, you start eating away at Disk Cache first, then Inactive Process. Ideally a 80-20 proportion.
Oct
31
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid The preemptive nature of Windows storing rarely used process code + memory into swap to make room for disk cache and the possibility of you launching one more process which could require free ram, is basically what my argument boils down to. Windows assume this is required because it thinks you might not have enough RAM for all your process needs. So, I might be wrong about this, and maybe Windows deals with it in a very smart way I'm unaware of, so please tell me if you have more details of this.
Oct
31
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid So with extra RAM to spare, the argument becomes, what should I use my extra fast storage space for? Disk cache or rarely used process code + memory? And I think there's a point where caching more and more of your disk files into RAM does not improve performance. Because you've got to ask yourself, is this file more likely to be randomly accessed then this process + it's memory? Off course, that depends on your usage, but I'd argue a process I started and stopped using is more likely to be used again then a file I've never accessed.
Oct
31
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid I mean run out of RAM for what RAM is originally meant for: transient memory. As you said, Windows also uses RAM as a cache for disk I/O. But Windows also take transient process memory that it feels are likely not to be used in a while, and store them in swap on disk. It does this preemptively, in case you suddenly require more RAM, it has already swapped out the old stuff and can store the new one. But if you have so much RAM, that this will never be an issue, it's not helping in any way, it's simply moving transient memory into a slower storage, which simply makes things slower
Oct
29
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid But everything still shows that Windows will page out to disk some stuff no matter what. My point is, some people have so much extra RAM, if they disable SWAP, they will never run out of RAM, ever. They'll even have enough RAM left for proper disk caching. In those cases, Windows will run faster with swap disabled. And I explain why by comparing the extra RAM to a really fast HDD for your swap. Also, I'm not sure about this:"Alright, between all the files on disk, and all the process memory, what is most likely to be needed next?" You have source?
Oct
28
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid I'm commenting a lot, sorry. The reason I say all this, is because it seems Windows assume you buy the amount of RAM you need for Active Processes. This is normally the case, since why would you pay for more RAM, when you don't need it. But recently, RAM has gone down, and some people are just adding RAM for fun. Which the memory manager does not take into account. It sees 32gig RAM and think you might be using most of it for concurrent active process, so it optimises for that. Some people get 32GIG just cause, in which case, disabling swap will make it even faster.
Oct
28
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid To directly address your comment: If I infrequently wake up the sleeping process, it still means that I do wake it up sometimes. Say I open outlook, never close it, but only check it every morning. It will be swapped out. But why? I have 28gig free, 4 gig active process using an average of 4 gig IO. I only need 4 gig IO cache for my active processes. So I feel it's better to use that 28gig to cache my outlook, etc., then to start caching more and more IO. I.E., when you have surplus RAM, use it as SWAP, instead of even more disk cache.
Oct
28
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
@DarthAndroid Ya, probably easier also to disable Swap. My point was that if you have extra RAM, but you do not need it for the amount of concurrent active processes + their potential disk IO, then the extra RAM can be viewed as simply a very fast page file, which is always better then using a HDD for swap. Arguably, the extra RAM is worthless, unless you use it for SWAP. 28gig of disk cache is overkill. It would be better to simply keep all processes that I've opened but never manually closed in there, even if they went to sleep, I am more likely to use them again than use a non obvious file.
Oct
22
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
Imagine my running processes used an average of 4gig of RAM, those running processes are reading up to 4gig of I/O that can be easilly predicted and I have a 128gig SSD on which resides my OS, files and page file. Say I have 32gig of RAM. It seems Windows would choose to have 4gig for active process memory and pretty much everything else as disk cache, about 28gig. While all inactive process memory would go to the page file. Given this scenario, if I open a sleeping process, it will page fault a lot. Putting swap in RAM would make those fault instant. In this case, I'd rather not cache disk.
Oct
22
comment Why does Windows 7 use the page file when there's free physical RAM?
I maybe support your answer. The thing that we need to know, and which I don't, is does Windows assume that the amount of RAM in your PC is there because your usage requires it? If Windows plans based on the amount of RAM, it could assume that even though 16gig is present, the user will be running for 16gig worth of proceses, so normal swapping and caching behaviour should still be used. Where as this isn't always true. Some people have 16gig, but really they only will ever need for 8gig max. It's almost like Windows should consider the extra 8gig as super fast swap space.
Oct
14
comment nx-client issue - no mouse or keyboard input
This doesn't work for me. I'm running NX rootless, so I get: user 12536 0.0 0.0 6508 620 pts/0 S+ 19:42 0:00 grep --color=auto nxagent
Oct
2
comment Find which process uses on average the most CPU, Memory and IO on Windows 7
Haha, ya iOS and Android all have these measures displayed in a very clear and useful way. I'm surprised nobody made an app for Windows. It seems like such a useful thing to diagnose what is slowing your computer down.
Nov
24
comment Is bigger capacity ram faster then smaller capacity ram for same clock and CL?
I had heard that since you cram more information on the platter, by packing them closer to each other, same as bluerays, you get speed boosts, because if you turn at the same rate, you are actually going over way more data, thus reading more of it. Maybe I'm wrong about hard-drives, and what I heard was false, but my question remains open for RAM.
Jul
20
comment Using Intel Rapid Storage Technology RAID-1 in “on request” update mode is a viable backup solution?
I understand how the best situation would be to have raid for fault tolerance, and have the raid backed up on an external drive. What I'm not sure I understand is why raid in a "per request" mode is not a backup. The old adage "raid is not a backup" used to make sense to me, until I found this "on request" mode. Now wouldn't that just be like having the raid driver copy the files, instead of having a backup software do it?
Jul
20
comment Using Intel Rapid Storage Technology RAID-1 in “on request” update mode is a viable backup solution?
My setup is that my OS is installed on a small SSD. My user files are backed up on my raid 1 array of hard drives. Since my SSD is a mere fraction of the size of my array, I also use the array to store large files, like Movies, Music, archived documents, pictures. What I want is that this hard-drive be also backed up onto my second identical HDD. I would also like this to be seamless, so that if one drives fails, I can just put the other in its place until I replace the broken one. That is why I thought a raid would work, not sure what are the disadvantages if I run it in "on request" mode.
Jul
20
comment Using Intel Rapid Storage Technology RAID-1 in “on request” update mode is a viable backup solution?
That is a good point, that raid 1 can not allow for revisions of the backed up data. I also guess using raid 1 for backing up takes a lot more space, since it copies the entire drive every time. While a normal backup would only copy the files that need to be backed up, and it can allow for fancy features like encryption and compression.
Feb
11
comment How to Boot another windows inside windows?
Is there a way to configure windows to accept 2 different hardware configurations? Or a way for the VM to simulate your exact hardware?
Jan
31
comment How to make a Windows User Acount that can not change anything?
Looking around about Deep Freeze led me to this really great software: Shadow Defender. It's similar to deep freeze, but has more features and is way cheaper. Highly recommended.