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bio website ithaca.arpinum.org
location New York, NY
age 46
visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen Dec 18 at 0:43

Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy


Jul
17
answered Mac OSX: conventional places where binary files should live
Jul
17
revised RootKit Hunter Warnings on Mac OS X
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Jul
17
answered RootKit Hunter Warnings on Mac OS X
Jul
17
comment How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
You're not likely to get one easily-shared answer for all Linux distros. Package management is a big part of what distinguishes different Linux distros.
Jul
17
revised How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
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Jul
17
revised How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
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Jul
17
comment How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
Also, apt-get isn't deprecated. Debian recommends aptitude for package management on the command line, but that's a far cry from deprecating apt-get.
Jul
17
revised How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
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Jul
17
revised How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
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Jul
17
comment How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
I think that you can get that information without needing grep: aptitude search '~i !~M' should do the trick.
Jul
17
answered How do you track which packages were installed on Ubuntu (Linux)?
Jul
17
comment Sync remote folders on Linux
Since rsync very likely is the simplest answer, explain what problems you're having with that. (The problems may spill over to any other solution, anyhow.)
Jul
16
comment Learning to Use Linux
Gentoo is outstanding for learning, but I also wouldn't recommend it for someone brand new to Linux. I might recommend Sabayon instead: it's Gentoo-based but offers a great deal of support for multimedia.
Jul
16
comment Learning to Use Linux
@codeLes: I would imagine that Ubuntu ships a healthy variety of wireless firmware, yes. I can't say for sure, since I don't use it, but on my Debian machines (Ubuntu is Debian-derived; they're related but not identical) the kernel is good to go, but I need to use a tool called b43-fwcutter to download the necessary firmware for the wireless. Your larger point is right, but I wanted to warn someone brand new to Linux that there may be a few steps before everything works. (In a few cases of proprietary hardware, it may be impossible, but that's rarer and rarer.)
Jul
16
comment Regex tool for Linux
@ Peter: I grant that spelling may be harder (for some people, some kinds of learners). Still, learn it. Software only gives you a false sense of security anyhow. Software can't spell well at all.
Jul
16
comment Learning to Use Linux
@Isxek: it would help if you gave the specs for the machine (at least in outline). What kind of video are we talking about? For a desktop, that (and sometimes sound) is usually the biggest hurdle.
Jul
16
comment Learning to Use Linux
The Linux kernel will not support his video (without extra help) if it's a recent Nvidia or ATI card, nor will it necessarily support wireless (without adding firmware). It can be done, but the kernel doesn't do it by itself.
Jul
16
awarded  Critic
Jul
16
comment Regex tool for Linux
Yup: I give the same advice about software to check spelling. Just say no. Learn it.
Jul
16
comment Things to consider going from Windows to Linux
@Jonathan: it's true that Windows (the os) and some programs used with Windows offer free updates (generally only within versions). It's also true that some Linux flavors charge money for the os. However, the default position in each world is clear: Windows -> software costs money; Linux -> software is free. (Yes, there are counter-examples, but these are the clear default positions.)