293 reputation
212
bio website schedulecourses.com
location Canada
age 26
visits member for 3 years
seen 2 days ago

Recent graduate with B.Seng degree. Working for IBM while maintaining small projects, like http://canadiandreamhouses.ca and http://schedulecourses.com.


Aug
23
awarded  Critic
Aug
22
comment History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
Again this doesn't answer the question or even address the problem. I have no problem with the history file location, just that it gets loaded automatically at login via ssh and does not when switching users with su - username.
Aug
22
comment History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
This doesn't answer the question or even address the problem. Maybe you misread the question?
Aug
18
asked Openoffice or Libreoffice Writer navigation hotkey to jump to next heading
Aug
13
accepted History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
Aug
13
comment History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
You are correct, this would work. I was worried that the history would not be loaded until a command was entered after logging in or sourcing the .bashrc, but this gets executed immediately when the first prompt is shown.
Aug
13
answered History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
Aug
13
comment History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
This does work for my specific scenario, but will not work when using su without the - or if connecting with ssh but not using the -t "bash --rcfile /path/to/.bashrc" option. I'd like to find a more reliable solution if one exists, like if it's possible to actually find out if .bashrc is being sourced manually or not.
Aug
13
comment History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
If I did this wouldn't it reload the history file each time I enter a command? If I have two or more terminals open (gnu screen or tmux) this would cause different panes/windows to cross-contaminate history. E.g. in one window I'm making changes to different htaccess files and restarting httpd, in another window I'm doing db2 queries to check things. If I have PROMPT_COMMAND set this way the history for these sessions will get mixed together and make repeated commands less convenient.
Aug
13
asked History in bashrc on login vs manual sourcing - clearing and loading
Jul
15
comment Cygwin tmux: “failed to connect to server: No error”
It seems that cygwin does not always use /tmp for the temp directory. My temp directory was /cygdrive/c/Users/<username>/AppData/Local/Temp/tmux-1000/ and saved in a few different variables: $TMPDIR, $temp, and $tmp. I'm not sure which one tmux was actually using, but if this answer doesn't work for someone out there, check these variables to see if tmux is storing its working dir somewhere else.
Jul
15
comment Cygwin tmux: “failed to connect to server: No error”
Thank you!! The strace showed me that tmux was creating its temp directory in /cygdrive/c/Users/<username>/AppData/Local/Temp/tmux-1000/ instead of /tmp where it seems to be for other people here. After I deleted that directory tmux was able to start normally.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
13
comment How do I edit previous lines in a multiple line command in GNOME Terminal?
The bash man page explains how to change which editor is used: edit-and-execute-command (C-xC-e) - Invoke an editor on the current command line, and execute the result as shell commands. Bash attempts to invoke $VISUAL, $EDITOR, and emacs as the editor, in that order.
May
6
awarded  Caucus
May
6
awarded  Constituent
Dec
10
revised What does “9-9-9-24-2N” memory timing mean?
Added explanation about what the actual numbers from the title mean
Dec
10
answered What does “9-9-9-24-2N” memory timing mean?
Nov
13
accepted Gnu screen: get around 100-character limit for commands - can't change hardstatus
Nov
13
comment Gnu screen: get around 100-character limit for commands - can't change hardstatus
I'm accepting this answer for the 100 char limit explanation about the behaviour. As for the second paragraph, I can accomplish this just using a .screenrc file (optionally naming it something else). Thanks for solving the mystery :)