81 reputation
29
bio website rene.kabis.org
location Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
age 41
visits member for 3 years
seen May 21 at 7:47

I am a long-standing geek, having been working with computers since 1982, on the Internet since 1989, and on the Web since 1992.

I have worked in the IT industry since 1998, but have recently refocused into becoming a CFO (many of whom are also in charge of IT departments… hint, hint) by completing my Bachelor of Business Administration with an Accounting major. I intend to become a Certified Management Accountant and eventually rise into a Controller/CFO position, hopefully in a company where I will also be in charge of their IT department.


Sep
12
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
27
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
19
comment Used a “slim” version of XP on an acquaintance’s computer… now I discover he needs features I cut out
Unfortunately, using the Add/Remove Windows Components rarely affects files on the drive itself, it just modifies their ability to function. For example, if you use that utility to “remove” Internet Explorer, you don’t actually remove it -- you just remove all the shortcuts to it. In my case, the problem I have is that there is no sr.ini file (nor associated files) for System Restore, nor a service available for it. Same goes for Outlook Express - the c:/Program Files/Outlook Express/ directory is completely empty.
Jun
16
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
When the transfer completes (according to the transfer window), it is the C: drive that continues to see activity for another 2-5 minutes. From what I recall, the D: drive ceases activity almost immediately (or it tapers off pretty quickly afterward). I will have to go back and check with another (short) transfer.
Jun
16
comment Used a “slim” version of XP on an acquaintance’s computer… now I discover he needs features I cut out
I have found it again. Why?
Jun
16
asked Used a “slim” version of XP on an acquaintance’s computer… now I discover he needs features I cut out
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
I can accept the bottleneck effect in theory, but in reality I have another two JBOD drives attached (port 1 & 6), and neither of them are showing 100% utilization either. Only C: on port 0. And my drive C: being soaked is directly related to the file move, as it happens only then. Pause the file move, and the soaking comes to a stop 2-5 minutes later. Start it back up, and it comes back.
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
There are only two changes between this setup and my old setup (aside from my choice of O/S). First is the choice of boot drive. My C: drive has traditionally been an IDE drive (to avoid having to load a customized RAID card driver when Windows is installed), but it is now a SATA drive on the RAID array (JBOD assignment). Secondly is the Antivirus - I typically use Symantec Endpoint Protection, but I don’t have the latest version available to me, so I used BitDefender free. But right now it is turned off -- with no change in drive utilization.
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
My D: drive (the destination for the data) is also showing 100% active time, but unlike C: drive it is also showing relatively high disk transfer rate, on the order of 3-4MB/sec. So this is really confusing me - why is C: showing 100% active time when there is virtually nothing being written to or read from the drive? All the action is clearly on D:, and yet C: is being soaked to the point of rendering the entire system unusable.
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
Technically, yes. Under Windows 8, you have a separation of stats in the Task Manager, and this is carried over to the graphical display of the Resource Monitor. One is called Active Time, “Percentage of time the disk is processing read or write requests”. That is sitting at 100%. The other is called Disk Transfer Rate, “Read and write activity on this disk”. This is sitting at close to 0KB/sec, especially when I am not doing anything else (like operating a web browser).
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
Sorted by file path under Disk Activity, turned off almost every single running program that was accessing C:, nothing gave me a total B/sec over 20K. On the other hand, D: was still being hammered with multiple file copy actions with total access speeds of 300K+B/sec (some at 400K+). The Write column was particularly telling -- nothing with a file path under C: was showing significant amounts, yet the drive itself was still “soaked” in the graphs.
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
(part 2): I have also confirmed that there is no change in drive usage from before a move operation to during the move by looking at the properties of the drive itself (right-click -> Properties). All I am using is the basic Windows Explorer file copy/move functionality. That is, I am dragging and dropping from my NAS onto the D: drive, with the shift held down to change a copy to a move.
Jun
15
awarded  Commentator
Jun
15
comment Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
(part 1): The problem with WinDirStat is that it is so drive-intensive that the move operation would complete long before that program would be allowed to finish. Remember -- my C: drive is getting utterly soaked. Starting any sort of a program takes about 15 minutes. Do something unusual in any program, and it locks up (not responding) for anywhere from thirty seconds to five minutes. Any attempt by any program to access C: is delayed and slowed down by (at least!) a factor of 100.
Jun
15
revised Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
fixed data transfer speed term.
Jun
15
comment Windows 8 keeps deleting files from RAID drive
You certainly have had some pretty strange problems here… FYI I have been using RAID arrays for nearly a decade now, and have never experienced something like this before. Personally, I would have backed up the data, broken the RAID, examined the drives with the manufacturer’s utilities, done a Spinrite on them for good measure, and then rebuilt a brand new array and tested that extensively before putting data back onto it. However, I think that the problem may have been more than just a bad RAID setup, you might also want to look into NTFS corruption.
Jun
15
awarded  Supporter
Jun
14
asked Data transfer from NAS to D: completely soaks my C: drive — why?
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
1
awarded  Student