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bio website systemterminal.com
location Ottawa, ON, Canada
age 33
visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen Dec 2 at 15:53

Jaywalking across the Information Highway ...


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comment Set height of Windows Vista taskbar buttons
I'm also looking at the registry to see if I can find an appropriate key to modify. I'll post an answer if I find anything.
Mar
18
comment Completely Uninstall Visual Studio 2010
@techie007 that's a good question. Since I'm not experiencing this issue myself (no check mark), I can't test that at all.
Mar
18
comment Completely Uninstall Visual Studio 2010
@techie007 we are aware of this. However, the issue at hand has to do with the issue described here: http://itexpertvoice.com/home/fixing-the-windows-7-read-only-folder-blues/ ... this is a problem in Windows 7, and is causing the crashing issue seen by the OP with IntelliTrace in VS 2010.
Mar
11
comment Completely Uninstall Visual Studio 2010
@Nick Udell I was thinking about this problem last night. Does a folder you create from Linux (with 777 permissions) also show up as read-only in windows? If not, you might be able to use linux to re-create the folder you need for VS.
Mar
11
comment Completely Uninstall Visual Studio 2010
Sucks. Sorry to hear that.
Mar
10
comment Completely Uninstall Visual Studio 2010
@Nick Udell Found this link which seems to be talking about this same problem you're having. Not sure if that helps.
Mar
10
revised When I'm compressing GBs of data with 10k plus of files and directories, how do I know there's no corruption?
added 130 characters in body
Mar
10
answered When I'm compressing GBs of data with 10k plus of files and directories, how do I know there's no corruption?
Mar
10
comment When I'm compressing GBs of data with 10k plus of files and directories, how do I know there's no corruption?
I think any better answer would require a bit of scripting to add a file or data block checksum to the process somehow. It doesn't look like the TAR archive program has any checksum verification for the data blocks (just the header blocks). Still looking, though.
Mar
10
comment When I'm compressing GBs of data with 10k plus of files and directories, how do I know there's no corruption?
I've been recently playing with the TAR and GZIP file formats in order to better understand them. I'll try to give you an answer for your question in a bit ... I'm making sure I have my facts straight. :) EDIT Nevermind, it looks like M'vy gave a good answer.
Mar
10
comment Windows XP does not recognize any portable media
heh, I ninja'd you. :) But your suggestion is essentially the same as mine. +1
Mar
10
comment When I'm compressing GBs of data with 10k plus of files and directories, how do I know there's no corruption?
Just a small comment, but I'm pretty sure that tar does not really compress the files by default (I don't think) ... it just balls them all together. I know that some versions have built-in GZIP compression, but by default they usually just build an archive file.