2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
source | link

vim is a text editor and doesn't have a syntax per say. What it has are defined language syntax so if you are working on say a .sh, .pl, or .html file it will highlight and color specific commands, methods, and properties that the imported defined language syntax is aware of.

If there is a specific language that you are interested importing something like this is what I would look for. There will most likely already be an XML created by somewhere out in the wide world web. Then import the XML created for that language. This is a similar post about importing defined language syntax into Notepadd++:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12574121/adding-a-user-defined-language-in-notepadhttps://stackoverflow.com/questions/12574121/adding-a-user-defined-language-in-notepad

Though it does matter if you installed Notepad++ in 'C:\Program Files (x86)' or in 'C:\Users\%username%\AppData.

vim is a text editor and doesn't have a syntax per say. What it has are defined language syntax so if you are working on say a .sh, .pl, or .html file it will highlight and color specific commands, methods, and properties that the imported defined language syntax is aware of.

If there is a specific language that you are interested importing something like this is what I would look for. There will most likely already be an XML created by somewhere out in the wide world web. Then import the XML created for that language. This is a similar post about importing defined language syntax into Notepadd++:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12574121/adding-a-user-defined-language-in-notepad

Though it does matter if you installed Notepad++ in 'C:\Program Files (x86)' or in 'C:\Users\%username%\AppData.

vim is a text editor and doesn't have a syntax per say. What it has are defined language syntax so if you are working on say a .sh, .pl, or .html file it will highlight and color specific commands, methods, and properties that the imported defined language syntax is aware of.

If there is a specific language that you are interested importing something like this is what I would look for. There will most likely already be an XML created by somewhere out in the wide world web. Then import the XML created for that language. This is a similar post about importing defined language syntax into Notepadd++:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12574121/adding-a-user-defined-language-in-notepad

Though it does matter if you installed Notepad++ in 'C:\Program Files (x86)' or in 'C:\Users\%username%\AppData.

1
source | link

vim is a text editor and doesn't have a syntax per say. What it has are defined language syntax so if you are working on say a .sh, .pl, or .html file it will highlight and color specific commands, methods, and properties that the imported defined language syntax is aware of.

If there is a specific language that you are interested importing something like this is what I would look for. There will most likely already be an XML created by somewhere out in the wide world web. Then import the XML created for that language. This is a similar post about importing defined language syntax into Notepadd++:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12574121/adding-a-user-defined-language-in-notepad

Though it does matter if you installed Notepad++ in 'C:\Program Files (x86)' or in 'C:\Users\%username%\AppData.