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I'm looking into upgrading my PC, but I'm a bit confused about ram speeds. This is my current setup.

  • Motherboard: Asus p6x58d premium
  • CPU: Intel Bloomfield i7 930 DDR3
  • RAM: Corsair CM3x2G1600C9 (3 x 2GB, in triple-channel 3/6 slots)

The issue is that there seems to be conflicting information about what ram speeds my current board supports. The Asus website says up to 1600 non-O.C.. However, the specifications section of the manual says up to 1333 non-O.C.. I've seen other sites that claim up to 1600 as well, but I'm not sure.

I went into my BIOS and turned my ram speed up from 1066 to 1333, but when I tried selecting 1600 a warning dialog popped up mentioning something about keeping the current voltage setting. Also, the setting description mentioned that only 1066 and 800 ram speed would work on a "locked" cpu. My CPU seems to be working fine at 1333 so far, but I really have no clue if my CPU is locked or not!

Is there a good way of telling the what ram speed that my PC supports?

  • I presume you have updated the firmware? ASUS specifically tested the memory you have, it specifically calls it out as being supports, your motherboard supports the memory you have at the stock memory frequency for those modules. You having a locked CPU is an entirely different story though. Anything faster then DDR3 800/1066 ( from intel's website ) would have to be overclocked, while the motherboard doesn't require additional voltage to the modules to run at those frequencies, your CPU must still not be locked to reach faster frequencies. – Ramhound Dec 1 '15 at 3:07
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You can easily run above 1600mHz. Download the manual for the board. I'm currently running 1800mH , I have been for 6 years.

Change the settings manually, still retaining default voltages, or using XMP or D.O.H.C settings in the bios.

Cheers

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