1

Struggled taking out the GPU, eventually managed and this happened.

enter image description here

I literally just received it today. Is it now broken?

  • 2
    I'm worried my eyesight isn't up to scratch. What bit do you think you've broken? – Jonno Jan 18 '16 at 15:42
  • 1
    Are you talking about the scuffs on the plastic? The only parts that make contact are the pins in between. For future reference, PCI-e slots have a small catch on the end, with that pushed aside, pull the card straight up. There is nothing else that should catch, as they're sprung pins making contact with a flat surface. – Jonno Jan 18 '16 at 15:46
  • Yeah I'm just referring to the plastic parts. On one of them there's a dent sticking out, hope that doesn't prevent the card from slotting in properly. – Rockett Jan 18 '16 at 15:51
  • 2
    Post a better image please. – Moab Jan 18 '16 at 15:53
  • 2
    When posting 'hidden puzzle pictures', please mark the item to be searched with a circle, to avoid too much searching. Paint.net is a good tool for that. – Tobias Knauss Jan 18 '16 at 16:25
1

I think you are good to go, as long as you are only referring to the scuffs on the top surface. Those openings are only there to aid in the pin insertion process during connector fab.

|improve this answer|||||
  • If you are running Linux, just type 'lspci' and see if your expected card is present in the list. If windows check your Device Manager. As long as it shows, I would feel safe assuming you are 100%. In the future if removing a component from your computer requires that much force, I would stop and re-assess. You should never be applying enough force to deform your connectors. Also, check your card for burrs in the FR4 at the card edge connector. Sometimes they can catch if the cut is rough. – deltatango Jan 18 '16 at 15:49
0

Yes and no (but you're probably fine).

Never force the graphics card (or any expansion card) out of its socket; if it's not budging, there's a reason for that. One of the most common reasons is that you do not release the catch on the back of the PCI-E slot:

enter image description here

By forcing your card out you could have damaged its pins; your photo isn't clear enough to be sure of this. The only sure way is to re-insert the graphics card and turn the system on.

From your photos it simply looks like you've just buckled the plastic slightly when you took the card out, and you're probably O.K. Again, the only sure way is to insert the graphics card and power up the system.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.