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I apologize if I don't get my terminology correctly, but I'm not a networking guru. I have a DD-WRT router that is behind my ISP's router. My ISP router gives me an IP address of 192.168.1.8. I set up my isp's router so that it would take my DD-WRT's routers ip address and gives it a public wan ip.

My DD-WRT router is setup to give out ip address in the 192.168.11.1/24 range. I am currently having an issue with my tv cable box as its plugged into my DD-WRT router as it blows up my router for some reason. Is there a way to give my cable box a public 192.168.1.x ip address?

Ideally I would like this to be based on the mac address. Also Im trying to avoid rewiring my network so just plugging my cable box into the isp's box works but it forces me to reconfigure my network. Sigh

  • What do you mean "it blows up my router"? If you want the cable box to have a 192.168.1.x address, then it need to plug into the ISP router. – Paul Feb 4 '16 at 5:08
  • Like whenever i try and watch tv it makes it so i can no longer watch tv or connect to wifi or have an ip address. – bdawg Feb 4 '16 at 6:10
  • Could you please add some more information of the box you are trying to hook up? the Provider and such? – NetworkKingPin Feb 4 '16 at 6:57
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EDIT: upon re-reading your question, It's usually not possible to put your TV box directly to your own router. Usually, if it's an ISP TV box, it has a special configuration/ VLAN setup that cannot be setup on your own router (without tedious and error prone custom configuration). Usually, your TV needs to be connected directly to the ISP's device.

Now, if your TV box is a third-party box that can be used with any ISP, then it shouldn't be giving you this problem.

If you're trying to avoid running another set of cables through walls, you can always try something like this Ethernet Splitter which allows you to have 2 separate networks using a single Ethernet line (albeit at 100mbit/s instead of 1000mbit/s)

You may also have what's called a double NAT situation. Make sure your DD-WRT modem gets an WAN IP address that does not start with 192.168.x.x.

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