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I never really got a good explanation how. From its example, it is used on the C: drive, which implies it is used on the Windows drive (with the Program Files folder, Windows folder, etc.)

But there's never really an explanation what a "system store device" really is. Is it where the BCD store is located? Is it the Windows C: Drive?

Can it be used on an EFI system partition to point to the boot files?

Edit:

What is the system partition, in the context of /sysstore? Is it the C: drive containing the Windows system folders, or the EFI System Partition?

  • Basic info: bcdedit /?; extended info: bcdedit /? /enum; current data (administrative privileges are required): bcdedit /enum all. Try bcdedit /? /sysstore as well. Read Bcdedit reference. – JosefZ Apr 28 '16 at 7:53
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    Already read it. Let me clarify: what is the system partition, in the context of /sysstore? Is it the C: drive containing the Windows system folders, or the EFI System Partition? – pinix Apr 28 '16 at 10:45
  • Please edit your question to add the info in your comment. – Moab Apr 28 '16 at 16:02
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bcdedit /sysstore <devicename>

This command sets the system store device.  This command is only valid for EFI
systems in cases where the system store device is ambiguous.  This setting does
not persist across reboots.

<devicename>        The name of a system partition to set as the the system
                    store device.  The device must be a system partition.

Example:

The following command sets the system store device as specified:

    bcdedit /sysstore C:

On a GPT disk there could exist zero, one or more EFI System partitions.

Maybe Windows has problems when there are more ESP's on a GPT disk and therefore the /sysstore option. Is the "real" ESP the first one, the second one or maybe the third one?

I think Windows assumes by default that first ESP is "the system partition" (where boot files are stored).

  • Thanks for the answer! I used it on my EFI system partition yesterday since for some reason W7 doesn't recognize it (I doubt it even knows it's in UEFI boot,) did not do anything worth noting (despite the success message.) – pinix Apr 30 '16 at 2:56

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