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Is there a command line equivalent to performing the GUI procedure to prevent driver updates as shown in this howtogeek article?

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How can I prevent Driver Updates from the command line?

You can modify the registry to add the same entries as the GUI procedure outlined in the How to Prevent Windows from Automatically Updating Specific Drivers article.

To find the correct registry entry look in the Group Policy Settings Reference Guide (see later in this answer for more information about the Group Policy Settings Reference Guide).

You will see that the registry keys for "Prevent installation of devices that match any of these device IDs" are:

HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DeviceInstall\Restrictions!DenyDeviceIDs
HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DeviceInstall\Restrictions\DenyDeviceIDs
HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DeviceInstall\Restrictions!DenyDeviceIDsRetroactive

reg add ... can be used to add the appropriate entries to the registry from a cmd shell or batch file.

I suggest you add at least one set of entries for a driver using the GUI procedure.

Then you can examine the registry entry added (using reg query ... or regedt32) and work out the exact format of the reg add ... command needed to add more entries to the registry for additional drivers.

Warning:

  • Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly.

  • For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs.

  • For more information see How to back up and restore the registry in Windows


Group Policy Settings Reference Guide

Microsoft has updated and made available as a download, the complete Group Policy Settings Reference Guide for Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012 R2.

The download is available in the form of spreadsheets for different operating systems. So you can download the spreadsheet only for those operating system/s which you may be interested in.

Spreadsheet Download Link

...

What is also very useful in these spreadsheets, is that it also lists the registry keys which are affected when the settings are changed. Of course, you can always use the Group Policy Settings Search, to know the registry key and value name that backs a particular policy setting, but these spreadsheets put them all in one place.

The Administrative Template spreadsheet contains three columns that provide more information about each policy setting’s behavior related to reboots, logoffs, and schema extensions. These columns are the following:

  1. Logoff Required: A “Yes” in this column means that the Windows operating system requires the user to log off and log on again before it applies the described policy setting.
  2. Reboot Required: A “Yes” in this column means that the Windows operating systems requires a restart before it applies the described policy setting.
  3. Active Directory Schema or Domain Requirements: A “Yes” in this column means that you must extend the Active Directory schema before you can deploy this policy setting.
  4. Status: A “New” in this column means that the setting did not exist prior to Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8. It does not mean that the setting applies only to Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8. Refer to the column entitled “supported on” to determine to which operating system the policy setting applies.

Source Group Policy Settings Reference Guide for Windows 10/8.1/7/Server


Further Reading

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