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I used to have a "Pentium Dual Core" processor and the temperature was not exceed 50C and all was fine... It's all started today when I converted to "Core 2 Duo" the temperature exceeds 75C and some times 80C. Is that dangerous?

Need to remind you that I've changed the fan into a new one and both the system fan and the door fan is working... Thanks in advance...

ُAdditional Information

  1. Thermal compound renewed.
  2. The processor is properly installed and readable and the system is fully bootable.
  3. The heat sink is "Matrix" .. a good one.

  4. I've changed the CPU fan.

  5. Reading Temperature via BIOS and Speccy.

  6. Model is Core 2 Duo E8400 3.0 GHz / 6M cashe / 1333 MHz FSB / Socket 775

  7. No brutal test yet, till now it's a moderate tests like system maintenance. defrag .... etc

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  • Yes; Those types of temperatures indicate a problem. Verify the heatsink is properly installed. Verify your motherboard actually supports the new CPU.
    – Ramhound
    Aug 1, 2016 at 4:48
  • Thanks @Ramhound for reply, and yes the heatsink is installed properly and the motherboard socket is the same as the processor and it is 775 Aug 1, 2016 at 7:18
  • Thanks @Psycogeek for reply, 1- The picture will be available soon. 2- Thermal compound renewed. 3- The processor is properly installed and readable and the system is fully bootable. 4- The heat sink is "Matrix" .. a good one. 5- I've changed the CPU fan. 6- Reading Temperature via BIOS and Speccy. 7- Core 2 Duo E8400 3.0 GHz / 6M cashe / 1333 MHz FSB / Socket 775 8- No brutal test yet, till now it's a moderate tests like system maintenance. defrage .... etc Aug 1, 2016 at 7:32
  • processors are hidden under a "heat spreader"- the metal thing you see. There is a very slim chance that the heat spreader is not making good contact with the actual CPU. You can see what i'm talking about in this video youtube.com/watch?v=LvS_qgn7OSs
    – Blaine
    Aug 1, 2016 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

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I would go ahead and reinstall the CPU fan again to make sure everything is fine. Also you didn't mention anything about thermal paste. Make sure you have the right amount. If none of this works, you could try buying a CPU cooler rated for a higher TDP.

75C - 80C is starting to push unsafe temp levels for long term use.

Generally, Lower CPU temp = Longer CPU life

Hope this helps! :D

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  • I've removed and reinstalled the fan over 4 times and nothing changes... But there is a thing valuable to mention, when I revert back to the old processor "Pentium Dual Core" the Temp don't exceed 45 as always.... May be the "Core 2 Duo" have a thermal issues? notice that my processor stepping is A and the most recent stepping is E which make me ask... had the first edition some problems like temperature?! Aug 1, 2016 at 7:46
  • on or around the 3rd time, you could check how both items Mate, outside of the computer. Anytime you did pull it the thermal compound should show how well it does match up the 2 surfaces. A picture of that would also be interesting.
    – Psycogeek
    Aug 1, 2016 at 9:53
  • @Ahmed Hassan Suror Maybe something's wrong with the CPU itself i.e. bad temp sensor or just a dud? idk
    – 0-60FPS
    Aug 1, 2016 at 18:02
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Try checking and lowering your CPU voltage in the motherboard BIOS. Maybe for some random reason, or just the default setting in your motherboard, the voltage might have gone a bit too high. If your CPU voltage is too high, it will generate unnecessary heat, especially if you aren't overclocking.

According to the intel website link the default voltages range from 0.8500V to 1.3625V, although from what i remember the stock voltage for Core 2 Duo/Core 2 Quad at stock speeds is around 1.25V. If system is stable at 1.25V, you can try lowering it a bit further to reduce heat without compromising performance. However if you lower your cpu voltages and the computer starts crashing, then you lowered too much, bring the voltage a bit. If you lowered too much and can't and your computer won't turn on, clear the CMOS.

CAREFULL: DO NOT RAISE YOUR VOLTAGE TOO MUCH, RISK OF DAMAGING YOUR CPU.

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