1

Laptop Toshiba Satellite (Model will post but not super critical as the info posted below).

  • Pre-Installed OS: Windows 8.1 Bing as C: Drive
  • Default booting is/ was UEFI

  • Wanted to create another partition to install a second OS as the C partition was huge.

  • Tried using DiskMgmt.msc and it just would not help resize/ reduce existing C partition.

Installed Easus Partition Master Server Edition 9.x and applied the following actions:

  • Resize C Partition
  • Format Unallocated empty space
  • It wanted to Reboot to complete actions.

Finally this is what I got and get now. I tried a few things outlined below.

  • Error Message: This error code is “0xc0000225”: enter image description here

Recovery

Your PC needs to be repaired.

An unexpected error has occurred.

Error code: 0xc0000225

You'll need to use the recovery tools on your installation media. If you don't have any installation media (like a disc or USB device), contact your system administrator or PC manufacturer.

Press Enter to try again
Press F8 for Startup Settings
Press Esc for UEFI Firmware Settings

If I press ENTER to try again, it gives me this:

Recovery

The application or operating system couldn't be loaded because a required file is missing or contains errors.

File:\windows\system32\winload.efi
Error code: 0xc0000225

You'll need to use the recovery tools on your installation media. If you don't have any installation media (like a disc or USB device), contact your system administrator or PC manufacturer.

Press Enter to try again
Press F8 for Startup Settings
Press Esc for UEFI Firmware Settings

Current Disk Status (as viewed by GParted and Paragon HDM 15 Premium):
I think there was an OEM OS Recovery/ Restore partition at the end of the HDD that may have been borked by Easus. Also, 1st partition was borked by Easus & Undeleted by Paragon HDM

  • 450 MB - Unallocated - I wonder why? Did Easus wipe it out?
  • 450 MB - System - Recovered by Paragon > Undelete Partitions

    • \$RECYCLE.BIN > ..\S-15-18 > desktop.ini
    • \BIN > ..\Logs ..\LOGS_PBR > PBR Boot, RicaDeployer, WinRE etc.
    • \boot > ..\en-us ..\fonts ..\resources ..files
    • \Recovery > ..\Logs ..\WindowsRE
    • \RicaTools > ..\BIN ..\Boot ..\efi ..\PLANFOLDER ..\SOURCES
    • \System Volume Information > tracking.log

  • 250 MB - FAT32 - Boot - GPT System Partition
    • \EFI > ..\Boot ..\Microsoft ..\toshiba
    • \Temp > bcdinfo.txt, bootfailure.txt, disklayout.txt, Srt Trail.log, Srt Trail.txt
  • 128 MB - NTFS - MSFTRES - Microsoft Reserved Partition
    • \System Volume Information > \ EfaData > SYMEFA.DB
  • 309 GB - NTFS - TIxxxxx (Original Preinstalled Win 8.1 Bing)
  • 155 GB - NTFS - W7SP1 (Created but not used as yet)

Thoughts & Actions:

  • I think the reboot (and some actions) did not go well due to UEFI (Existing Install( vs BIOS booting (Maybe thats what this version of Easus was trying to do).

  • I realized this may have been a mistake and I should've used the Bootable PE DVD version of a newer Paragon Partition Manager premium that I believe would be more UEFI aware as well as PE DVD boot would not undergo this "mixed" Reboot mishap.

  • I booted from an Win 8.1 DVD and applying Startup Repair etc 3+ times (as suggested on EightForums and no dice.

Partition and Disk Updates:

  • Although there was a Pre installed restore partition (maybe at the end of the disk) I don't think it works or can be invoked anymore. Will try and post more details on it.

  • Was able to recover the "Unallocated" 450 MB partition, which I think was the WinRE partition

I'm quite familiar with EasyBCD, bcdboot.exe and use them, but this time I'm on a slight mental block on how to proceed.

Any thoughts on what I could do to get the original OS booting?

  • What are you seeing error message or not working correctly wise when you boot now? What is it doing that indicates the problem exactly? – Pimp Juice IT Aug 8 '16 at 14:49
  • @PIMP_JUICE_IT - Updated more info as machine & my access were spread out – Alex S Aug 12 '16 at 12:52
  • Alex - Did you get this resolved yet? Did you run into any problems with the below answer help you any or are you still having trouble? Let me know and I should have further information for you if still needed. – Pimp Juice IT Aug 12 '16 at 13:41
  • @PIMP_JUICE_IT I will post back when I have my win 8.1 disc in hand and try out some of this. Any other tips also welcome. Please post as comments or answer. Thanks. – Alex S Aug 12 '16 at 13:44
3

Use diskpart

A common is to use the diskpart utility (available on the Windows 8/8.1 recovery disc/USB) to make sure the UEFI partition has a letter assigned to it. If it doesn’t, you’ll assign it a letter.

The instructions you need to follow are:

  1. Insert your original Windows 8 installation disc or Windows 8.1 installation USB
  2. Boot from the disc or the USB
  3. At the Install now screen, click Repair your computer or press R
  4. Click Troubleshoot
  5. Click Advanced options
  6. Click Command Prompt
  7. When Command Prompt has finished loading, type: diskpart
  8. Press Enter
  9. The diskpart utility should now be loaded: DISKPART>
  10. Type: sel disk 0
  11. Press Enter
  12. Wait for the confirmation message: Disk 0 is now the selected disk.
  13. Type: list vol
  14. Press Enter
  15. diskpart will now show the full list of volumes available on your PC enter image description here
  16. Find the UEFI volume from the list. This usually has “BOOT” mentioned on the Label column, “System” on the Info column. The Fs column might FAT32 specified. For our example, in the next steps, our UEFI partition will be on Volume 2.
  17. Type: sel vol 2
  18. Press Enter
  19. Type: assign letter=G:
  20. Press Enter
  21. Wait for the confirmation message:
    DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point.

  22. Type: exit

  23. Press Enter
  24. Type: cd /d G:\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\

    Where G: is the drive letter you’ve assigned to your UEFI partition a few steps back.

    If the \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\ folder doesn’t exist (the error message will be “The system cannot find the path specified”), you can run the same command on alternative paths:

    cd /d G:\Boot\

    or

    cd /d G:\ESD\Windows\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\

    Remember to replace G: with the UEFI’s partition letter.

  25. Type the bootrec command: bootrec /fixboot

  26. Press Enter
  27. For backup purposes, backup the BCD record of your computer like this: ren BCD BCD.bak
  28. Recreate the BCD using the bcdboot command: Bcdboot C:\Windows /l en-us /s x: /f ALL

    Where C:\ is the letter of the drive where Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 is installed on.

    The /l en-us parameter is used for localization: US. You can use ln /en-gb for UK localization.

  29. Press Enter

  30. You can also run this command too: bootrec /rebuildbcd
  31. Press Enter
  32. Type exit in Command Prompt
  33. Restart your computer
  34. Your Windows 8/8.1 should now boot again

source

  • Ok. Mistake I made was using CMD under Paragon HDM DVD.. Figured it had the MS basics.. Booted Win 8.1 DVD UEFI mode. Got it back with /fixboot + /rebuildcd and lo and behold during startup message.. Easus boot mode.. I was thinking. Hope it doesnt do something more. Thanks. My mistake to use an older Easus vs a newer Paragon HDM and I always do it via Boot DVD, rarely from within the OS, requiring reboots. Lets see if the recovered partition etc. brings all the WinRE stuff back? – Alex S Aug 13 '16 at 13:06
  • 1
    "If the UEFI partition on your computer doesn’t have a drive letter assigned, this may be the primary cause of your computer’s boot error." Would like to point out, this is not true. Windows and most other OS's keep the UEFI partition hidden to avoid anything trying to tamper with it. Therefore, if the UEFI partition doesn't have a drive letter, it shouldn't affect booting. However you need the UEFI partition to have a drive letter if you need to do more than basic debugging or custom setups etc etc. – Frostalf Aug 14 '16 at 3:54
  • 1
    @Frostalf I just took that part out of the referenced text I provided to satisfy your concern. Regardless, the ultimate goal is what it is with the applicable commands, etc. so whether or not that particular portion you pointed out is accurate or not is really irrelevant but I'm happy to take out that particular portion of this quoted answer for your specific concern with this regard... – Pimp Juice IT Aug 14 '16 at 6:38
2

First things first, you need to Launch repair computer from an install disc. Next you need to launch the command prompt

Run

booterec.exe /fixmbr

bootrec.exe /fixboot

and then you are going to want to run

bootrec.exe /rebuildbcd

These three commands should fix your problem.

Also, for next time you want to resize your partition's without much problems, download gparted. It downloads as an ISO and you use it to boot a linux live OS to use gparted. Its always wise to do disk manipulations like this while the drive is not in use as it reduces errors you might run into. Also I have used Diskparted before and it can make EFI partitions or is EFI aware.

  • Did the Startup Repair from DVD 3/4 times. Do not have DVD right now, but will run these as the next items. - Please take a look at updated information. PS: A bit spread out machines v/s my Net v/s DVDs so took a while to update. @Frostalf – Alex S Aug 12 '16 at 12:51
  • Given that the preinstall Win 8.1 was a UEFI (on a UEFI m/c), would FixMBR work fine even with a GPT disk? – Alex S Aug 12 '16 at 12:54
  • @AlexS Yes, even though its UEFI you still need to use it. FixMBR is to fix the bootloader, where as fixboot fixes the bootsector – Frostalf Aug 12 '16 at 13:04
  • Ok. Mistake I made was using CMD under Paragon HDM DVD.. Figured it had the MS basics.. Booted Win 8.1 DVD UEFI mode. Got it back with /fixboot + /rebuildcd and lo and behold during startup message.. Easus boot mode.. I was thinking. Hope it doesnt do something more. Thanks. My mistake to use an older Easus vs a newer Paragon HDM and I always do it via Boot DVD, rarely from within the OS, requiring reboots. Lets see if the recovered partition etc. brings all the WinRE stuff back? – Alex S Aug 13 '16 at 13:08

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