1

So, I have this older computer. It is a Pentium 4, maxed out with 2GB of DDR1 memory and a GeForce AGP video card. I've had it since the Windows XP days.

I upgraded it a year back with a crucial SSD drive, and surprisingly it now runs Windows 10 Pro (32-bit) with decent speed and responsiveness, as long as you're only doing a few tasks. In our business, we mostly just use it for data entry in Excel, and it works fine for that.

The technical details don't really matter, I'm just trying to set the stage here for a question about Windows 10 in general (I may make a separate technical post re: my problem).

So a couple weeks ago I installed the Windows 10 Anniversary update to this older machine, and again, it surprisingly took it without a single problem. But just this past week, Microsoft released a cummulative update for Windows 10 v1607 and...

...now my machine won't boot anymore. Just to be sure, I wiped the drive and did a CLEAN install of Windows 10 Pro v1607 (Anniversary Edition). It runs great. But as soon as it downloads the first set of post-AE updates, I can't boot. It always takes me to startup repair.

So here's my question. Considering Windows 10 updates are now obligatory... what exactly is my recourse to deal with this situation? I guess I could go back down to Windows 7 or 8, but I actually have liked Windows 10 on this machine up until this point. I've been using it for more than a year. And yet it seems I can't use Windows 10 anymore. That is such a weird feeling in software land, to be given a piece of software that works, to be forced to update, and to have no way of going back.

My question is also to and about Microsoft. It seems to me that, considering that they've said that Windows 10 is "the last Windows", that if they continue to update Windows 10 indefinitely, eventually every computer will eventually be rendered inoperable by some future update. How and will Microsoft handle this responsibility to maintain the functionality of people's computers? I know there was a recent controversy with the AE disabling the functionality of many people's webcams, but at least their computers still boot.

My computer booted and ran Windows 10 just fine for more than a year. Now it can't. What do?

migrated from serverfault.com Aug 27 '16 at 6:22

This question came from our site for system and network administrators.

  • Dude we just got done picking on someone for asking an off topic question on ServerFault and then you drop this. Et tu Brute? ET TU?! :'( – Wesley Aug 27 '16 at 5:01
  • Where would I ask this? Is there a Microsoft-centric stack? – Daniel Aug 27 '16 at 5:03
  • Nah, it's more SuperUser stuff. I think you'd get a better answer over there. It'll probably get migrated there through votes. But I could be wrong. Wouldn't be the first time. – Wesley Aug 27 '16 at 5:05
  • I thought about that. I'm using Windows Pro in a business environment. It is a rather general question though. – Daniel Aug 27 '16 at 5:08
  • For example, I know I can set a GPO to disable automatic update on this machine, and that is a ServerFault kind of question (and I already know that answer). My question is more about... how do we kill the Microsoft beast? – Daniel Aug 27 '16 at 5:13
1

What is the long term plan with Windows 10? Does anyone even know?

Yes. Microsoft knows and they have an abundance of information on their plan and road map for Windows 10 that's readily available if you seek it out.

if they continue to update Windows 10 indefinitely, eventually every computer will eventually be rendered inoperable by some future update

Probably, but is that really any different to a 10 year old machine not being able to run Windows 7, 8 or 10? I don't think it is. Just as people have had to move to new hardware over the years to accommodate newer versions of Windows so will they have to to accommodate newer builds of Windows 10. I don't really see any difference between the two.

I know there was a recent controversy with the AE disabling the functionality of many people's webcams.

That's not a product of the new build, that's a product of Microsoft having goofed up that particular piece of the update. That's no different than having a hardware component fail after an update in Windows 7 or 8. It's a bad update, that doesn't make the OS as a whole bad. Again, I see no real difference between the two.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.