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so this afternoon when i booted up my laptop, i got redirected to the dell supportassist screen. it told me that my system seemed to be having trouble starting up, so it was scanning for issues. it told me no hardware troubles were detected. my laptop had been booting up just fine last night - it took me right to the gnu grub, which is what i use as i have my system dual booted with both windows 10 and elementary os on uefi. my laptop also supports legacy boot, and i always kept my boot settings with legacy roms support enabled, and uefi boot which meant that secure boot was disabled.

i tried doing the typical turning it on and off again, multiple times. that didn't make a difference. when i open up the boot options, none of my uefi boot options would be there - it would usually be windows 10 (sometimes called boot manager), cd/dvd drive, ubuntu (since elementary os is based off of ubuntu), and the usb drive.

i tried resetting the bios defaults but that didn't do anything, and i can't boot into legacy because it says there are no bootable devices found due to the fact that all of my bootable devices are on uefi. i also have tried disabling and enabling legacy roms, that didn't resolve any issue.

i have a dell inspirion 15 5558, 1tb hdd, 8gb ram, i3.

  • "and i can't boot into legacy because it says there are no bootable devices found due to the fact that all of my bootable devices are on uefi. " - This doesn't make sense. If your HDD was MBR before, it should still be MBR, espially if Elementary OS is working. – Ramhound Oct 24 '16 at 15:07
  • @Ramhound the thing is, windows 10 came preinstalled on uefi. in order ti successfully install elementary os and to be able to dual boot; i had to install it on uefi. elementary os is not working. grub isn't showing up. none of my uefi boot options are available, only legacy but i have no operating systems installed on legacy so i can't boot. – syonia Oct 24 '16 at 15:20
  • Your question is confusing. Why do you mention, " i always kept my boot settings with legacy roms support enabled", if you had UEFI mode enabled? You also mention Secure Boot was disabled, Secure Boot is an optional feature, and Elementary OS supports it or it should since Ubuntu does. – Ramhound Oct 24 '16 at 15:22
  • "i also have tried disabling and enabling legacy roms, that didn't resolve any issue." - Why did you try this? – Ramhound Oct 24 '16 at 15:23
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As a general rule, if you're booting in EFI/UEFI mode, enabling BIOS/CSM/legacy support in the firmware is pointless at best and creates problems at worst. See this page of mine for a detailed explanation of why this is so.

That said, I don't think your activation of BIOS/CSM/legacy support is an issue in your case; it sounds like, despite being active, that support was not causing any problems before, and it probably isn't causing problems now. (I could be wrong, though, in which case disabling the BIOS/CSM/legacy support might fix your problem.)

My suspicion is that something has corrupted your boot order and/or boot loader entries. You may be able to fix this with any number of tools, including the firmware's built-in tools (not all have such tools, and they vary greatly in user interface and so are next to impossible to describe), the bcfg tool in an EFI shell (see here for some information on using it; but entering an EFI shell might or might not be easy for you in your system's current state), the EasyUEFI Windows tool, or efibootmgr in Linux (see here for one of many brief introductions to this tool). Most of these will require you to get some OS or shell booted. To do that, your best bet is likely to be my rEFInd boot manager on a USB flash drive or CD-R. See here for download links to both types of media images.

If your boot loader configuration is very badly damaged, as might be the case if the EFI System Partition (ESP) has suffered filesystem damage, you might need to re-install your boot loader or install a new one. The Boot Repair tool is a relatively easy way to install GRUB 2, which should get most Linux distributions up and running; or you might prefer to install rEFInd instead of GRUB. If the Windows boot loader is damaged, you'll need to follow Windows repair procedures, with which I'm less familiar.

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