2

I am running Windows 10 Professional on a 3-year old Thinkpad laptop, and the process named as Microsoft IME has been constantly consuming around 30% of my CPU. After looking up what IME means, it seems it is referring to the Input Method Editor. This process is running with high CPU consumption at all times, even when I am not using the Chinese input methods.

enter image description here

Is the IME related to input methods? To avoid this constant energy and CPU consumption, should I uninstall the Chinese input method? The input methods I have installed are as follows:

enter image description here

3
  • FYI: reddit.com/r/Surface/comments/55ny3x/… – Jon Nov 1 '16 at 3:10
  • Open a cmd.exe as admin, run the following command: wpr.exe -start CPU && timeout -1 && wpr.exe -stop C:\HighCPUUsage.etl. When you see the high CPU usage, wait 30s and press a key to stop logging. Zip the large ETL file into zip/RAR file, upload the zip (OneDrive, dropbox, google drive) and post the share link here. – magicandre1981 Nov 1 '16 at 5:26
  • @magicandre1981 Thank you for pointing out what I need to prepare for debugging this particular issue. In the mean time, I have found a compromise, as posted. – llinfeng Nov 1 '16 at 17:29
1

Partial Solution

Acknowledgement

Thanks to @Jon, this riddit post could have potentially solved the exact problem. However, due to the concerns listed under the same Riddit post, I have postponed to practice their solutions on my obsolete laptop.

MY partial solution (not working yet)

Like most bugs on Windows OS, restarting the machine/process should solve the problem. Here goes a piece of AutoHotKey script that does only one thing: "kill the process named ChsIME.exe". My Windows 10 OS have managed to start a new instance of this process right after the termination of the previous process.

; Kill the Windows IME process using keyboard shortcut -- Alt+Ctrl+Shift+I
^!+i::
    process, exist, ChsIME.exe
    pid = %ErrorLevel%
    Process, Close, %pid%
return

I am aware that this is by far not a clean solution, and I will post my system logs of high CPU usage when it happens next time.

System logs when ChiIME.exe is using up to 34% of CPU

https://www.dropbox.com/s/trkl647cbc6epjt/HighCPUUsage.zip?dl=0

Observation: SYSTEM is running that high-CPU ChsIME.exe process

enter image description here

1
  • I can see that the ChsIME.exe (15008) is calling a server and doing Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC) calls, but no idea how to fix this. submit te issue in the feedback hub app and include a link to the ETL – magicandre1981 Nov 2 '16 at 5:19
0

Let me post what solved this issue in my case, please notice it might be a very specific interaction of IME, but I thought it might helps others in similar situation.

I was going nuts due to ChsIME.exe getting constant high CPU (kinda loop-buggy), but looking closer I also found my antivirus eating CPU as well. Somebody suggested to disable the antivirus but it would not disable itself [in this case Avast Behaviour Shield] as it keeps looping as well.

I uninstalled the IME keyboard extension temporarily (Win 10, Language and keyboard options), and as soon as I killed the consuming IME process the antivirus stopped itself and the CPU went down to idle - wow so that's interesting, who's fault is it?

1
  • I guess it can also be a machine/"customized"-OS problem. In partiular for a newer Lenovo T480 laptop, I can get 2 hours of battery life with "Windows 10 OS from Microsoft" and 4+ hours of battery life from "Windows 10 - Downloaded from Lenovo's OS-distribution system". A tone of other processes should be involved. I would suggest going with a proper Windows OS first, then debug the processes :) – llinfeng Dec 17 '19 at 14:22
-1

There is a solution posted on http://windowsreport.com/fix-microsoft-ime-high-cpu-usage/

I have tried and it is working for my Surface Pro 4.

2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.