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In MS Word (2003), when I want to keep a line (that is formatted as a hyperlink+header) and subsequent lines (regular text) on the same page, the only way that works for me is to choose format/paragraph/keep with next.

The option format/paragraph/keep lines together which seems the obvious choice, doesn't seem to work.

The problem I have with using keep with next is that it's fine when the relevant lines are towards the end of the page, but if subsequent editing pushes them towards the middle or top of the page, they still end up in the next page, and I'm left with a large unnecessary white space.

Where can I read what are Microsoft's definitions for keep with next, keep lines together, and widow/orphan control?


Notes:

  1. Keep lines together in Word; but the heading gets cut off suggest using styles, but I have quite a few different formatting for the first line (in different places of the document), which makes this suggestion impractical.
  2. How to keep lines together in Word seems to answer keep lines together, but it'd still be nice to see MS definition.
  • @MátéJuhász Gently now. He has done research on SU. :) – mcalex Nov 3 '16 at 9:31
  • @MátéJuhász Your link doesn't actually answer the OP's question. – DavidPostill Nov 3 '16 at 18:25
  • Ah, it's so gratifying to have one's answer voted down without so much as a word of explanation... – boardrider Nov 5 '16 at 11:58
6

Microsoft's documentation for the pagination types seems to be documented in Remove a Page Break:

  1. Widow/Orphan control places at least two lines of a paragraph at the top or bottom of a page.
  2. Keep with next prevents breaks between paragraphs you want to stay together.
  3. Keep lines together prevents page breaks in the middle of paragraphs.

This blog post from CompuSavvy explains the options in more detail.

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