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This question already has an answer here:

When I inspected my monitor I found a hole with a lock symbol (pictured below).

What is this? What is the function of this hole?

enter image description here

My monitor is a Samsung Syncmaster SA100.

marked as duplicate by random Nov 16 '16 at 22:53

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    -1, this question shows zero research effort. You didn't even try to open the users's manual, or google for "K lock". Or even crop your photo to something more reasonable. – Dmitry Grigoryev Nov 16 '16 at 16:27
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    @DmitryGrigoryev How could he google for "k-lock" if he didn't know it was a lock back then? – Buffer Over Read Nov 16 '16 at 19:55
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    @TheBitByte There's a letter K and a lock icon right there in the picture. Alternatively googling a few words from the question title (e.g. lock hole monitor) would give similar results. – Dmitry Grigoryev Nov 16 '16 at 20:43
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    I used "lobang dibelakang monitor" keyword – Vahn Nov 17 '16 at 1:54
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    @DmitryGrigoryev Looking at the image, I did not recognise the |< symbol as a "K", nor the 'blob' as a lock - and I knew what the slot is for!! – TrevorD Nov 24 '16 at 0:02
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It's called a Kensington lock, or Kensington security slot, and it provides an attachment point for a cable to prevent your monitor from being moved or stolen.

laptop with Kensington lock attached

from Wikipedia

  • It's funny how you say "[...] to prevent move / steal of your monitor." but then you show an image of a laptop. But that exactly it. It is very used on stores (like Stapples, for example). I haven't seen any use besides there. – Ismael Miguel Nov 16 '16 at 11:39
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    Note that these locks are also common in computer labs for schools. They use this to lock the desktop tower and the monitor to the desk so that they can leave the lab open and people can't (easily) steal the equipment. – jrh Nov 16 '16 at 12:22
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    @JamesTrotter We don't have that problem here. And if we do, they are usually locked with a stronger steel lock, going around the screen and on a hole on "specially-made" horizontal computer cases. (I have it between quotes because those are pretty much standard cases, but have a bit of metal with a hole, where the cable goes through.) The cable is then attached to the table/desk. I had these at school and saw a bank with these too. – Ismael Miguel Nov 16 '16 at 13:29
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    Given that the bolt of a Kensington lock is fairly small, one might cynically say its purpose is not to prevent theft, but to obviously damage the case if the thief just rips it out, thereby reducing the resale value. – Ulrich Schwarz Nov 16 '16 at 18:30
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    @UlrichSchwarz I had often thought of that also, but I think it's still very useful in some situations. For example, if you have your laptop at a library or a Starbucks, you could secure it to a table while you go to the restroom. The lock/cable would be enough to prevent someone from casually walking off with it - at least not without making a scene. – Charles Burge Nov 17 '16 at 1:37

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