1

TL;DR At the bottom of this post

So I know it is possible to change citation styles. As base I'd like to use IEEE, the bibliography from IEEE looks really nice to me.

However, I'd like to change the markup from [1] to 1. in the bibliography. And the inline citation from [1] to an actual copy of the bibliography.

Example current situation!

[69]    J. M. Spool, "What makes a design seem 'intuitive'?," 10 01 2005. [Online]. Available: https://articles.uie.com/design_intuitive/.

Example wanted situation!

69.     J. M. Spool, "What makes a design seem 'intuitive'?," 10 01 2005. [Online]. Available: https://articles.uie.com/design_intuitive/.

The above situation is what I actually want as citation and bibliography markup.

The ISO 690 Markup got close by actually using the dot instead of brackets, but the inline citation wasn't what I wanted.

I've been looking trough the XLS Files to find the settings I need to change, but quite frankly .. I've got no idea what I'm doing.

Currently I've looked with the help of the following sources:

http://bibword.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=Styles_FAQ&referringTitle=Documentation

http://www.officetooltips.com/word/tips/change_the_type_of_brackets_in_citations.html

https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/search/en-US?rq=site%3Ahttps%3A%2F%2Fblogs.msdn.microsoft.com&rn=blogs.msdn.microsoft.com&ral=1&query=citations%20bibliography&ac=4#refinementChanges=108&pageNumber=1&showMore=false

But I found nothing. This is my current file: http://pastebin.com/qE4dNzL9

I guess I need to change something here as most tutorials show it:

<xsl:template name="templ_prop_OpenBracket" >
    <xsl:param name="LCID" />
    <xsl:variable name="_LCID">
        <xsl:call-template name="localLCID">
            <xsl:with-param name="LCID" select="$LCID"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:value-of select="/*/b:Locals/b:Local[@LCID=INITIAL_CONTENTLCID]/b:General/b:OpenBracket"/>
    <xsl:text></xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="templ_prop_CloseBracket" >
    <xsl:param name="LCID" />
    <xsl:variable name="_LCID">
        <xsl:call-template name="localLCID">
            <xsl:with-param name="LCID" select="$LCID"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:value-of select="/*/b:Locals/b:Local[@LCID=INITIAL_CONTENTLCID]/b:General/b:CloseBracket"/>
    <xsl:text>.</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

I did change [@LCID=$_LCID] to [@LCID=INITIAL_CONTENTLCID] with the added xsl:text tags, but no results.

Any ideas of where to look?

EDIT: I found one of the things I was trying to accomplish. The following was able to remove the brackets, and display a dot:

<xsl:template name="templ_prop_SecondaryOpen" >
    <xsl:param name="LCID" />
    <xsl:variable name="_LCID">
        <xsl:call-template name="localLCID">
            <xsl:with-param name="LCID" select="$LCID"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:variable>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="templ_prop_SecondaryClose" >
    <xsl:param name="LCID" />
    <xsl:variable name="_LCID">
        <xsl:call-template name="localLCID">
            <xsl:with-param name="LCID" select="$LCID"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:text>.</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

This means that the layout goal for the Bibliography has been reached, but the citation is still in progress.

69.     J. M. Spool, "What makes a design seem 'intuitive'?," 10 01 2005. [Online]. Available: https://articles.uie.com/design_intuitive/.

Example: Citation currently changed from [1] to 1.

The following tag creates the citation, but I still have issues on how to display more info.

<xsl:template name="Citation">

I've tried using the tags from the b:Source tag inside the Citation tag, but this shows no information on the linked citation.

Updated XSL File: http://pastebin.com/EvBE10Ct Location of the file in my case was: AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Bibliography\Style

Other location could be Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\Bibliography\Style

TL;DR I'd like to have the same mark-up for the citation as used by the Bibliography. Which shall look like this: 69. J. M. Spool, "What makes a design seem 'intuitive'?," 10 01 2005. [Online]. Available: https://articles.uie.com/design_intuitive/.

-1
+50

My best advice is to use Mendeley. It's completely free and it manages all your sources for you. You just have to load in the PDF's (of the articles you own) or the citation you can download from the articles online. Then you install the Mendeley add-in in Word. With the click of a button you then can search for the source you want and add the citation to your document. The style in which the sources are referenced can be chosen to fit the one you want.

  • Not really the solution I was looking for, but might still be usefull for other people – Hespen Nov 29 '16 at 21:37

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