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I have a server on CentOS Linux mydomain.com 2.6.32-504.16.2.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Wed Apr 22 06:48:29 UTC 2015 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

I see the folder /usr/ with more than 18G.

When I do a list with du command I note that exist one file /usr/share/locale/zun/LC_MESSAGES/temp is over 7G is that normal?

Picture of the file on command-line:

enter image description here

Can I remove this file?

UPDATE:

root@myserver.com [~]# cat /etc/rsyslog.conf
# rsyslog v5 configuration file

# For more information see /usr/share/doc/rsyslog-*/rsyslog_conf.html
# If you experience problems, see http://www.rsyslog.com/doc/troubleshoot.html

#### MODULES ####

$ModLoad imuxsock # provides support for local system logging (e.g. via logger command)
$ModLoad imklog   # provides kernel logging support (previously done by rklogd)
#$ModLoad immark  # provides --MARK-- message capability

# Provides UDP syslog reception
#$ModLoad imudp
#$UDPServerRun 514

# Provides TCP syslog reception
#$ModLoad imtcp
#$InputTCPServerRun 514


#### GLOBAL DIRECTIVES ####

# Use default timestamp format
$ActionFileDefaultTemplate RSYSLOG_TraditionalFileFormat

# File syncing capability is disabled by default. This feature is usually not required,
# not useful and an extreme performance hit
#$ActionFileEnableSync on

# Include all config files in /etc/rsyslog.d/
$IncludeConfig /etc/rsyslog.d/*.conf


#### RULES ####

# Log all kernel messages to the console.
# Logging much else clutters up the screen.
#kern.*                                                 /dev/console

# Log anything (except mail) of level info or higher.
# Don't log private authentication messages!
*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none                /var/log/messages
*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none                /usr/share/locale/zun/LC_MESSAGES/temp

# The authpriv file has restricted access.
authpriv.*                                              /var/log/secure
authpriv.*                      /usr/share/locale/zun/LC_MESSAGES/temp

# Log all the mail messages in one place.
mail.*                                                  -/var/log/maillog
mail.*                          /usr/share/locale/zun/LC_MESSAGES/temp


# Log cron stuff
cron.*                                                  /var/log/cron

# Everybody gets emergency messages
*.emerg                                                 *

# Save news errors of level crit and higher in a special file.
uucp,news.crit                                          /var/log/spooler

# Save boot messages also to boot.log
local7.*                                                /var/log/boot.log
local7.*                        /usr/share/locale/zun/LC_MESSAGES/temp


# ### begin forwarding rule ###
# The statement between the begin ... end define a SINGLE forwarding
# rule. They belong together, do NOT split them. If you create multiple
# forwarding rules, duplicate the whole block!
# Remote Logging (we use TCP for reliable delivery)
#
# An on-disk queue is created for this action. If the remote host is
# down, messages are spooled to disk and sent when it is up again.
#$WorkDirectory /var/lib/rsyslog # where to place spool files
#$ActionQueueFileName fwdRule1 # unique name prefix for spool files
#$ActionQueueMaxDiskSpace 1g   # 1gb space limit (use as much as possible)
#$ActionQueueSaveOnShutdown on # save messages to disk on shutdown
#$ActionQueueType LinkedList   # run asynchronously
#$ActionResumeRetryCount -1    # infinite retries if host is down
# remote host is: name/ip:port, e.g. 192.168.0.1:514, port optional
#*.* @@remote-host:514
# ### end of the forwarding rule ###
  • This is a very old kernel, i think you were hacked. – Ipor Sircer Jan 3 '17 at 21:08
  • Ops I cant update that server is very old and it have many users. What I can do? – Jose Carlos Ramos Carmenates Jan 3 '17 at 21:09
  • Don't think this one was hacked, this is a log file I think (not certain though, don't have a Centos server myself). – ojs Jan 3 '17 at 21:10
  • You might have better luck with someone recognising this file on unix.stackexchange.com – ojs Jan 3 '17 at 21:11
  • Please add the output of cat /etc/syslog.conf to the post. – ojs Jan 3 '17 at 21:24
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As you can see from /etc/rsyslog.conf then this file is a log file, if you just view it with cat, more or less then you should see the logs in it. It is safe to delete this file if you don't care about logs that much. Try though to figure out why this file is so big, if it is because it is so old and has never been rotated like most files in /var/log are or if something has been logging heavily recently into this file.

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