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So the main router has 192.168.0.1 IP address and the second one, an Asus AC1200G+, 192.168.1.1 for it's DHCP network. On the other hand it's static IP is 192.168.0.120. I have a plotter and NAS (synology) attached to the main router, unable to move those things because of office space.

Is there any posible solution to print and backup files from those 4 laptops to those to devices connected to main router, using Asus router? And if, how can I do that?

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    The problem you have is that you have two different networks. I'm willing to be that 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.1 are both /24 (subnet mask 255.255.255.0). That means that devices on 192.168.0.x can talk to anything else on 192.168.0.x and devices on 192.168.1.x can talk to anything else on 192.168.1.x, but the two separate networks can't talk to each other. In order to fix this, you need a route between the two. Sometimes this can be done in the router, sometimes the easiest way is via static routes - but either way, you need a rule that lets one network know how to reach the other. – MaQleod Feb 15 '17 at 22:41
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Well after a little bit more search on internet about the second router I find out that it has AP function and also can be used as print server (forget to mention, there is a print server for second router, for those laptops). And finally I set up the second router like an AP, with 192.168.0.210 IP address, leaving the same wireless network but with 192.168.0.X addresses. Beeing in the same network now everybody sees everybody. Many thanks for your time and I should read more about networking.

Thank you

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  • I'm glad you got it sorted. ;-) – Elder Geek Feb 17 '17 at 13:12
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You could use a non-standard netmask for a class C network (normally 255.255.255.0) as indicated in this comment and use a netmask of 255.255.0.0 instead. This should allow traffic from any 192.168.x.x device to any other 192.198.x.x device.

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    Network classes are dead, killed in 1993 by RFCs 1518 and 1519, which defined CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing). Modern networking doesn't use network classes. Please let classful networking rest in peace. – Ron Maupin Feb 15 '17 at 23:24
  • @RonMaupin is right. There's nothing wrong with the subnet masks used by the asker. The problem comes from the router's LAN IP being in a different subnet from the LAN itself (192.168.0.0/24 vs 192.168.1.0/24). – Larssend Feb 16 '17 at 2:15
  • @Larssend So is it your contention that changing the netmasks on the notebooks with the IP's 192.168.1.30 through 192.168.1.33 to 255.255.0.0 won't allow connectivity to the NAS and plotter at 192.168.0.100 and 192.168.0.20 with the OP's current setup? – Elder Geek Feb 16 '17 at 15:25
  • @ElderGeek That's not what I tried to get across. – Larssend Feb 17 '17 at 0:43
  • @Larssend My apologies for my failure to understand what you were trying to get across. I wouldn't request clarity if I didn't want. it. Perhaps I was confused about your reference to addresses on entirely different networks as being on different subnets? – Elder Geek Feb 17 '17 at 13:09

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