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I have attempted to use the old "Run as Administrator" fix for this particular program that is forcing the user to provide Admin elevation every time they launch with no success. It still asks for admin elevation every time. I am reticent to allow local admin for this one program, but don't have much of a choice.

If it helps, the application is a GUI written probably 20 years ago that layers on top of an Access database. It had been updated to work with Access 2010, but that was long before I arrived on the scene. The program runs from a mess of a shortcut that throws a bunch of arguments that I'm not familiar with. The shortcut ultimately points to "runaccess.exe" which also requires administrative elevation. I have tried setting both the shortcut and the executable to Run as Administrator with no luck. Still prompts for admin elevation every time.

To clarify - I am not just trying to bypass accepting a UAC prompt. It is asking for an administrator password every time the application is run. I would like to have this program running for users "the right way" and not just give them local admin, as has been done in the past.

To summarize, I have tried:

-Properties -> Compatibility -> Run as Administrator

-Looking through the registry for a 'runasadmin' flag tied to Access - it didn't exist

And that's about all I could find. Thanks for the advice!

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I have read your message several times over and it appears to me that you really don't know what "Run as Administrator" does. This command triggers a UAC prompt! However, from your question, it appears you have been meaning to use this command to suppress a UAC prompt instead of triggering it.

I have attempted to use the old "Run as Administrator" fix for this particular program that is forcing the user to provide Admin elevation every time they launch with no success.

The long and short of it is: If double-clicking on an EXE file causes a UAC prompt to appear, issuing a "Run as Administrator" command (be it from the context menu, shortcut properties or compatibility settings) makes ZERO difference.

It also appears that in addition to wanting to suppress the UAC prompt, you also (reluctantly) want to give the admin rights! Sorry, but you can't keep your pie and eat it too.

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