The hotspot I'm connected to has the SSID 12346🐷. I need to use the netsh wlan show profile <SSID> command, but cmd doesn't appear to have unicode support. What do I do?

bleh

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I experimented quite a bit with emoji in cmd, and these are the conclusions that I came to:

  1. In most cases, you can substitute the emoji with ??.
    This is what the netsh wlan show profile (which lists all the network profiles) command shows me:
    bleh2
    In the above case, you can simple run the command netsh wlan show profile 12346??.
  2. But... CONFLICT! What if there are two identical SSIDs, just with different emoji?
    To test this out I created a second hotspot with the SSID 12346😁. CMD obviously couldn't differentiate. bleh3
    But the output of netsh wlan show profile 12346?? had something interesting:

    Profile 12346?? on interface Wi-Fi: 
    ======================================================================= 
    
    Applied: All User Profile    
    
    Profile information 
    ------------------- 
        Version                : 1
        Type                   : Wireless LAN
        Name                   : 12346??
    
    Connectivity settings 
    --------------------- 
        Number of SSIDs        : 1
        SSID name              : "12346dY~?"
    
    
    [[REDACTED IRRELEVANT INFO]]
    
    
    Profile 12346?? on interface Wi-Fi: 
    ======================================================================= 
    
    Applied: All User Profile    
    
    Profile information 
    ------------------- 
        Version                : 1
        Type                   : Wireless LAN
        Name                   : 12346??
    
    Connectivity settings 
    --------------------- 
        Number of SSIDs        : 1
        SSID name              : "12346dY?·"
    

    First we notice that cmd (very smartly) runs the command for both SSIDs. But we only want to run it for one SSID...
    Secondly, we see that one has been assigned the SSID 12346dY~?, and the other 12346dY?·. However, using either of these in the command just gives us an error... Bummer!

  3. So what do we do?? Pretty simple, you use the Touch Keyboard (on Windows 10) to insert the emoji into the console, or you can copy-paste the emoji from elsewhere, both work perfectly, even though the emoji isn't displayed properly.

  4. What about Files and Folders? I created two folders, 😎 and 😆. This is what tree shows: bleh yet again Luckily for us though, we can simply use tab to circle through the folder names at the prompt, but again, we have no way of actually viewing the folder names. In this case, one option is to rename the folders by using the ren command. Another option is to use the dir command to inspect the properties of the files/folders and determine which one you need.

  5. Just use ConEmu!
    ConEmu apparently has better unicode support: VICTORY!

  • 3
    Interesting read (and source for the last image): Abusing Emoji in Windows – rahuldottech Apr 9 '17 at 12:09
  • The Windows 10 Creators Update appears to be pushing you to use powershell over cmd, is unicode supported there? – Mokubai Apr 9 '17 at 12:35
  • @Mokubai Apparently not on anniversary update – rahuldottech Apr 9 '17 at 14:22
  • 1
    UPDATE! This screenshot shows the command necessary to enable unicode in powershell. Thanks @Bob! – rahuldottech Apr 9 '17 at 15:19
  • To clarify further, the screenshot in @Rahul2001's last comment is from the PowerShell ISE program (included with PS), not the basic console. The chcp 65001 is meaningless, but there must be some kind of external command called first to force the ISE to allocate a console and allow [Console]::OutputEncoding to work; a plain chcp works too. – Bob Apr 9 '17 at 15:27

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