0

Some years ago (quite before actually) I managed to dual boot a notebook. Back in that day I used windows (don't remember which) and Fedora. To do this I bought a program so as to repartition the disk without losing data, and then after that I installed Fedora in one partition. I also had to have a different partition (FAT32 if I remember) that can serve to "share" data between both systems.

Since that time I haven't done that, used windows and macs usually, and lost track of linux (except at work with embedded micros that used a particular flavor of debian)

Anyway, right now I have a brand new windows 10 machine (and I am already hating it), so I would like to ask you

1) what is the current particular procedure to dual boot my system with windows 10 and linux? (I repartitioned my windows 10 disk and it was not difficult at all, it seems that maybe I won't need a special tool as I needed before)

2) Which linux would be recommendable. (I am thinking Ubuntu is the most popular now- a debian like one, so different than my experience with fedora- but then I heard of others. Overall I want a particular distribution that gives me the less hassle in installing it with windows)

3) Some people argue that instead of dual booting- virtualizing is preferable. How true is this? (I have some experience working with VMWare (run debian on a windows 7 machine) and frankly it does not "feel the same" )

4) what things do I have to be careful, so as to have the dual system running as soon as possible?

Any recommendation tutorial or advice greatly appreciated

2

1) what is the current particular procedure to dual boot my system with windows 10 and linux? (I repartitioned my windows 10 disk and it was not difficult at all, it seems that maybe I won't need a special tool as I needed before)

Split into multiple partitions. (If you already have partitions, re-partition. Install one operating system (shouldn't matter which). Install the other operating system. Install a boot manager if you don't already have one. Configure boot manager.

Details will depend on what operating systems you use. Also, they will depend on which partition format you use: GPT or the older MBR. Years ago, MBR was much more common, as the GPT standard didn't even exist a few years before that.

2) Which linux would be recommendable. (I am thinking Ubuntu is the most popular now- a debian like one, so different than my experience with fedora- but then I heard of others. Overall I want a particular distribution that gives me the less hassle in installing it with windows)

This is strongly a matter of preference. As there is no technically-correct answer, this is not a good question for SuperUser. If you want to know what's most popular, DistroWatch.com is one place that ranks popularity.

Ubuntu used to be notably more popular. Last I checked, Mint took over that spot. Ubuntu has slipped, even below Debian.

3) Some people argue that instead of dual booting- virtualizing is preferable. How true is this? (I have some experience working with VMWare (run debian on a windows 7 machine) and frankly it does not "feel the same" )

Virtualizing is probably more convenient to use, but there can be drawbacks (including less speed, and less compatibility with some hardware). Some people find virtualization may be a much bigger pain in the neck to set up easily; perhaps you can set up a bootable system, but then networking might be a pain to set up. But, once set up, it's usually not an ongoing challenge/problem.

The primary advantage is probably that you don't have a need to quit one operating system to run another. Other things, like built-in support for snapshots, might be other advantages (that might exist), perhaps based on which software you use.

4) what things do I have to be careful, so as to have the dual system running as soon as possible?

  • Don't destroy your existing data before having backups.
  • Make sure each operating system has enough disk space.
  • You probably want much of your data to be in a common partition that both operating systems can easily read and write. (Preferably, all operating systems can read and write all the filesystems that are used on all the partitions.)

Dual Booting was once just for the daring; now the process has been documented in more places, and probably software being easier than before.

I realize that some of these answers may seem weak, due to being generic. However, that is because of the questions asked. Many of these questions don't have specific precise answers. (I was almost tempted to vote to have the question be closed, but I decided to be nice and provide an answer.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.