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I have two routers:

  • A DrayTek (wired) router, which has two internet connections. Its LAN IP is 192.168.1.2 (/24).
  • A D-LINK (wireless) router retransmiting internet connection from the DrayTek, with this configuration:
    • WAN IP 192.168.1.22   (so it can talk to the DrayTek router over wired connection)
    • WAN Gateway 192.168.1.2 ← router with internet (DrayTek)
    • LAN IP 192.168.0.1 (/24)

The wireless clients use 192.168.0.1 (the D-LINK router) as their gateway.  I can access the setup page of the D-LINK router at the 192.168.0.1 address (by wireless), but I want to know if it is possible somehow to enter it by wired.

My PC is connected to the DrayTek router with cable (it doesn't have any wireless card, and it is too far from D-LINK anyways). I need to connect to the D-LINK router from this PC.

PC IPs:

  • (wired) 192.168.1.150 ← the Internet can be reached through the DrayTek, but the PC can't access the D-LINK by its 192.168.1.22 IP address.
  • (wired) 192.168.0.150 ← just to try, but definitely not working, because there is no way to reach wireless network of the D-LINK.

I tried to redirect a public port in the DrayTek to the D-LINK (192.168.1.22:80) and it doesn't work.

Small picture with the way devices are connected to the network

I notice that the LAN cable is connected to the internet port of the D-LINK, so actually a solution can be to connect another cable in one of the LAN ports and using a static IP of range 192.168.0.x and it works... but the question still... is a way to access the router with the cable connected on its internet port (through 192.168.1.22)?

  • If I changed your meaning incorrectly,  please fix it. – Scott Oct 14 '17 at 21:13
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I don't think you'd be able to access the wireless router's configuration via a wired connection, unless your wired connection is plugged into the wireless router.

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  • D-LINK is connected to the same network as the PC, through a switch. In order to clarify, I updated my question with a small graphic of the way devices are connected. – LogoS Aug 3 '17 at 22:37
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    The dlink creates a separate network. Anything plugged into the DLink is NOT on the same network as the PC. You have 192.168.1.0/24 and 192.168.0.0/24, so you have two separate networks. For anything on one network to talk to the other, there needs to be a proper route. 192.168.0.0/24 knows its gateway is 192.168.1.2 - so it can forward traffic there for that network, but does 192.168.1.0/24 have a route back? – MaQleod Aug 3 '17 at 23:37
  • D-Link effectively creates the network 192.168.0.0/24, but don't forget that my goal is to reach setup of D-Link, which is connected to the same network as the PC (d-link 192.168.1.22 and PC 192.168.1.150), what I don't really understand is why I can't enter the setup with that IP. But if the only way to enter the router is through its 192.168.0.1 IP then: where do I need to establish the route back to 192.168.1.0/24, D-Link or DrayTek? – LogoS Aug 4 '17 at 13:16
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The solution I found is to change a D-LINK option that allows remote access to the router (ie, by its external IP: 192.168.1.22).

This is the option in D-LINK: Picture of the enable remote administration

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    This is incorrect. The problem is that your DLink is using the same subnet as the Draytek. Thus when you attempt to connect to the Draytek at 192.168.1.2 the Dlink says "this IP isn't meant to be sent out on my WAN port... it's meant for another computer connected to me on a LAN port... but there's no computer with that IP connected to me... so it must just be the wrong IP... sending failure error to source requester" Change the Dlink (and the computers connected to it) to use a 192.168.0.x address. Then the Dlink will know 192.168.1.x addresses are meant for the DrayTek's network. – Cliff Armstrong Aug 7 '17 at 16:27
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    Additionally one or both devices might be able to be configured in bridge mode which lets them pass data back and forth seamlessly. The Dlink may also have an AP-only mode. Either will allow just one router to be responsible for NAT... resolving the problem entirely. This is the ideal solution. What you've done may work, but it's possibly the worst solution... as it undermines the security of your network. – Cliff Armstrong Aug 7 '17 at 16:30
  • Firts of all, I think you made a mistake, D-LINK IP is 192.168.1.22 (point twenty two), DrayTek is 192.168.1.2 (point two). – LogoS Aug 7 '17 at 16:56
  • For the rest, sorry if I didn't ask it well enough, my original goal was to be possible to enter to the setup of D-LINK without changing its network setup. And this is the only solution I can found. If you have a better one please let me know. – LogoS Aug 7 '17 at 16:56

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