9

Is there any way to resize an imgur.com image using the query string when I use it on a forum?

This image is too big for some forum and it ruins the pagination.

incredibly huge image in a forum

  • 2
    the image somehow really freak me out... – gagantous Nov 21 '17 at 14:42
18

You can specify the small version of the image by appending s to its base URL.

For example, the URL of your original image is https://i.stack.imgur.com/Brjd7.jpg.
By adding s this becomes https://i.stack.imgur.com/Brjd7s.jpg:

smaller image versionhttps://i.stack.imgur.com/Brjd7s.jpg

Some images may have an ultra-small version of the image, accessed by adding ss, thus making it https://i.stack.imgur.com/Brjd7ss.jpg, but your image does not have one.

Here is the list of all the modifiers for dimensions (not all are always available) :

  • s = Small Square (90×90) as seen in the example above
  • b = Big Square (160×160)
  • t = Small Thumbnail (160×160)
  • m = Medium Thumbnail (320×320)
  • l = Large Thumbnail (640×640)
  • h = Huge Thumbnail (1024×1024)
  • 1
    the answer hints at that, but it is the pixel area and proportions of the original image that determine which of the modifiers will be available. A very narrow but tall rectangular pic, for instance, might not produce a "s" version even if the original is high quality. Or it might produce urls where "m" (medium) is the same as "l" (large). The <img src="x" width="N" /> method (described in this answer) can produce a custom resize for these edge cases, but it's slower than just adding a modifier to a URL. – init_js Oct 19 '18 at 7:48
3

It may depend on the type of encoding the forum uses.

On Stack Exchange you can use the line <img src="[url]" width="[nnn]"> to specify the size quite precisely.

eg
<img src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/Brjd7.jpg" width="123">

The advantage of this method is the full size image is available to anyone who needs to see it, by right-clicking & opening in a new tab.

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