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I am currently studying information technology with a specialization in Network Administration, and I have this issue I am trying to understand.

I went to my mom's workplace and I overheard her and her office mates complaining about the slow internet speed and that it comes and goes (Request Timed Out).

So they called an IT guy and the man said the reason the internet was slowing down was one of the PCs in the office has low RAM. He said when the person using that particular device opens multiple tabs and the PC starts lagging, it causes the internet to slow down for all of the other PCs connected to the AP. His solution is they should add RAM to the PCs.

I kind of doubt that solution. Why would one particular PC affect anybody else's connection because of low RAM?  Does the IT guy's statement make sense?

There are 3 desktops and 5 laptops connected to the access point.

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    That diagnosis is easy to test: Disconnect the particular PC from the network when the network slows down, and see if that speeds it up. If that PC is indeed the culprit, the next thing to do is to measure network throughput on this PC when the network slows down. Whatever it turns out to be, I doubt more RAM will help with overall network speed.
    – dirkt
    Nov 7, 2017 at 7:10
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    Is the machine in question running network services like DNS or DHCP? More RAM would help in this situation.
    – Burgi
    Nov 9, 2017 at 9:26

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Well... I don't believe that the lack of RAM will cause the wireless to slow down for all. I do believe that depending on the wireless capabilities of certain computers, other computers can get affected. For example, there are multiple standards in the wireless (WiFi) arena. You have 802.11b which runs at a max speed of 11Mbps (Or an 802.11 Rate of 11), you have 802.11g which runs at a max speed of 54Mbps (Or an 802.11 Rate of 54) and you have 802.11n which runs at a max speed of ~300Mbps (Or an 802.11 Rate of ~300). Anyway, if all your computers have an 802.11g (54Mbps) adapter and one machine has an 802.11b (11Mbps) adapter - In this case, the 802.11b (11Mbps) computer will affect the speed of all the other computers. There is an explanation for this, however I will not get into it. I hope this answers your question and you can take this to your IT guy. He's flat out wrong!

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