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I want to have all of Apple Logic’s sample and loops on an external drive with a Symbolic Link in /Library/Application Support. I’ve done this before on a different Sierra system, and had no problems, but on this new Sierra system I’m getting a Permission Denied message. I’m admin, but apparently I only have Read privileges to the Application Support folder.

But that was the case on the other Sierra system, and I was able to create a Link.

Anyway, I tried using BatChmod to give admin Write privileges to Application Support folder, but after executing, nothing changed. I still, as admin, had no Write privileges.

I really only need temporary Write privileges to this folder, just long enough to create Link, and then revert back if I need to. I am definitely out of my league and don’t want to screw up my system, but I can follow simple command line directions. I’ve read about sudo /bin/bash and sudo bash and enabling root user, but I can't figure out which is the quickest, safest way accomplish my objective.

Terminal:

Terminal

Before BatChmod:

Before BatChmod

After BatChmod:

After BatChmod

  • I think it will help if you show the actual commands that you're attempting to execute, the output you get, and perhaps the output of the id command. – RobertL Jan 4 '18 at 7:34
  • Thanks Robert, I've uploaded three pics to OP. You can see the Terminal output. And the attempt via BatChmod (before and after) to give admin permission to AppSupport folder... upon refresh of Get Info, nothing has changed. – mathesar Jan 5 '18 at 14:38
  • In addition to the traditional Unix file modes, OSX (and some other Unix and Linux systems) also use "ACLs" (access control lists). Even after you ran BatChmod, the box in the lower left still says "you can only read", which I think is because of the ACLs. I don't have an OSX to test. – RobertL Jan 5 '18 at 20:59
  • Try executing sudo id (you may be prompted for your - not the root - password). If you see something like "uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root)", then you can use sudo to get root permissions. So then you would just need to execute the very same ln command, but prefixed by sudo: such as sudo ln -s /Volumes/Janus/... – RobertL Jan 5 '18 at 21:03
  • Robert, that did it! It was surely a simple thing to you, but I did not know it. Thanks so much for your help. – mathesar Jan 7 '18 at 18:21
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To obtain root permissions for only one command, you can use sudo.

If you type sudo id (you may be prompted for your -- not the root -- password), and see something like uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root), then you can use sudo to get root permissions. (uid=0 is the important part.)

So then you would just need to execute the very same ln command, but prefixed by sudo, such as

sudo ln -s /Volumes/Janus/... 

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