5

I'm trying to read a file that contains a date in the filename.

The problem is when the date format is US in the system: mm/dd/yyyy it does not working .

For this format : dd/mm/yyyy it works as expected.

I need to get the date in this format dd/mm/yyyy even so the system is set with US format.

I'm new with batch and no idea how to get the date in the required format.

Here is my batch file:

for /f "delims=/ tokens=1-3" %%a in ("%date%") do (
rem Lets name our new variable "rdate" for reverse date
set _date=%%a-%%b-%%c
)

set source=%path%.csv
echo %source%
set dest=%path%_%_date%.csv
echo %dest%
3
4

It sounds like a bad idea to be parsing a date that could be in various formats which format you don't know. Better to get the date in a specific format, even if that means not pure batch but invoking powershell.

C:\Users\tod>for /f %a in ('C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowershell\v1.0\powershell -Command "Get-Date -format yyyy_MM_dd__HH_mm_ss"') do set datetime=%a

C:\Users\tod>set datetime=2018_01_22__09_15_33

or without time.

C:\Users\tod>for /f %a in ('C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowershell\v1.0\powershell -Command "Get-Date -format yyyy_MM_dd"') do set datetime=%a

C:\Users\tod>set datetime=2018_01_22

C:\Users\tod>

And by the way that Year/Month/Day i.e. yyyy/mm/dd format is very nice as it is easily human-readable in both the UK and USA. No worries about if it's dd/mm/yy like uk. Or mm/dd/yy. You see e.g. 2018 first so you know it's year first and then you know that after the year is the month and then the day.

Once you have that date in the format you kmow, and I suggest yyyy/mm/dd format, you can do

C:\Users\tod>echo %datetime:~0,4%
2018

C:\Users\tod>

And so on.. So you can set whatever variable to equal the year, month, date in month.

Added

If you wanted to not use powershell and you don't mind that this will only work for US formatted dates.

C:\Users\tod>echo %date%
01/22/2018

C:\Users\tod>echo %date:~0,2%
01

C:\Users\tod>echo %date:~3,2%
22

C:\Users\tod>echo %date:~6,4%
2018

C:\Users\tod>

So you really should be able to see how to do it

set first=%date:~0,2%

set second=%date:~3,2%

set third=%date:~6,4%


C:\Users\tod>set first=%date:~0,2%

C:\Users\tod>set second=%date:~3,2%

C:\Users\tod>set third=%date:~6,4%

C:\Users\tod>echo %first%/%second%/%third%
01/22/2018

C:\Users\tod>echo %second%/%first%/%third%
22/01/2018

C:\Users\tod>

So you can say set ukdate=%second%/%first%/%third% and you can say echo %ukdate%

And that non-powershell method only works if you know the format of the date on the system, and know that it's US. I would generally recommend against batch, because for example what if a new revision of the OS comes along and the output of a command is a bit different and your code presumes a particular format in its parsing. And while in this case batch is in one sense, neat, sometimes it can be like banging sticks together. It's a good idea to know batch and to use it a bit but to install some other scripting language like Ruby or Python or Golang or NodeJS. But if you want to use solely batch for this, then there it is.

9
  • is there any other way to set it without using the Powershell ? – user3070123 Jan 22 '18 at 9:56
  • @user3070123 Yes. Answer coming up. – DavidPostill Jan 22 '18 at 11:43
  • It's trivial to get the date in a locale independent format in a batch file. See my answer How can I get the date in a locale independent format in a batch file? – DavidPostill Jan 22 '18 at 11:58
  • @DavidPostill Firstly I did get the date in a batch file(both with and without powershell - pure batch). Secondly, Is wmic(which your suggestion uses) preferable to powershell? if the user is asking how to do it using pure batch then WMIC isn't really pure batch either. – barlop Jan 22 '18 at 12:38
  • @DavidPostill Also you wrote in your answer "Using %date% to provide a solution is, as used in the other answers, " That is totally misleading. I provided two solutions here, one in pure batch(no powershell no wmic), using %date% which states that disadvantage at the start. And the other solution that uses powershell and doesn't use %date%. – barlop Jan 22 '18 at 12:58
1

How can I get the date in a batch file in a locale independent format?

I need to be displayed with this format dd/mm/yyyy

First, what not to do:

  • Using %date% to provide a solution is, as used in the other answer, dependent on the OS Locale, Regional, and Language settings and may provide wrong or missing information.

  • For example, the short date format on my PC does not output the weekday at all.

The right way to solve the problem:

  • Using wmic, on the other hand, works independently of OS Locale, Language or the user's chosen date format (Control Panel/Regional).

The following batch file uses wmic to retrieve the date and (local) time, so doesn't suffer the disadvantage of a solution using %date%.

getdate.cmd:

@echo off
setlocal
rem get the date
rem use findstr to strip blank lines from wmic output
for /f "usebackq skip=1 tokens=1-3" %%g in (`wmic Path Win32_LocalTime Get Day^,Month^,Year ^| findstr /r /v "^$"`) do (
  set _day=00%%g
  set _month=00%%h
  set _year=%%i
  )
rem pad day and month with leading zeros
set _month=%_month:~-2%
set _day=%_day:~-2%
rem output format required is DD/MM/YYYY
echo %_day%/%_month%/%_year%
endlocal

Example output:

> getdate
22/01/2018

Modify your batch file as appropriate to use the above code, for example:

@echo off
setlocal
rem get the date
rem use findstr to strip blank lines from wmic output
for /f "usebackq skip=1 tokens=1-3" %%g in (`wmic Path Win32_LocalTime Get Day^,Month^,Year ^| findstr /r /v "^$"`) do (
  set _day=00%%g
  set _month=00%%h
  set _year=%%i
  )
rem pad day and month with leading zeros
set _month=%_month:~-2%
set _day=%_day:~-2%
rem output format required is DD/MM/YYYY
set source=%path%.csv
echo %source%
set dest=%path%_%_day%/%_month%/%_year%.csv
echo %dest%
endlocal

Further Reading

  • An A-Z Index of the Windows CMD command line - An excellent reference for all things Windows cmd line related.
  • for /f - Loop command against the results of another command.
  • getdate - Display the date and time independent of OS Locale, Language or the users chosen date format (Control Panel/Regional).
  • variables - Extract part of a variable (substring).
  • wmic - Windows Management Instrumentation Command.

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